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OAT Optometry Admission Test course outline | https://www.flatoffindexing.com/

OAT course outline - Optometry Admission Test Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: OAT Optometry Admission Test course outline January 2024 by Killexams.com team

OAT Optometry Admission Test

Tutorial : 15 minutes

Survey of the Natural Sciences : 90 minutes

Reading Comprehension Test : 50 minutes

Break (optional) : 15 minutes

Physics Test : 50 minutes

Quantitative Reasoning Test : 45 minutes

Post Test Survey : 10 minutes

Pre testing up to : 25 minutes

Total Time 275 to 300 minutes depending on the number of pretest questions



The OAT is an optometry admission test designed to provide optometry education programs with a means to assess program applicants potential for success. The OAT is administered year round by Prometric test centers in the United States, its territories (including Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and Canada.



The OAT is comprised of multiple-choice test items presented in the English language. The test is developed according to established test specifications. The OAT consists of a battery of four tests on the following: Survey of the Natural Sciences, Physics, Reading Comprehension, and Quantitative Reasoning. In the OAT, both the U.S. customary system and the metric system (Imperial System) of units are used.



Before starting the application process, read the OAT Guide. At the time of application, you will be required to confirm that you have read this document, understood its contents, and agree to the policies and procedures contained herein.



How does one prepare for the OAT? There are no shortcuts to the process of learning, and these test preparation materials are not designed to provide the examinee with an opportunity to bypass the extensive process of learning and understanding basic information through class participation and months of study. These test preparation materials contain samples of the four tests used in the Optometry Admission Testing Program. These are available to OAT examinees as a means of discovering possible areas of weakness in their comprehension of subjects covered by the test. They will also enable the examinee to become familiar with the types of material included in the test as well as with the general coverage and format of the various parts of the test battery.



The Optometry Admission Testing Program may include pretest questions in some test sections. Un-scored pretest questions are included on the test in order to ensure that these questions are appropriate before they are included among the scored items. If pretest questions are included in a test section, additional time will be allotted to that section of the test. Pretest questions are intermingled with the scored questions; therefore it is important to answer all questions.



The time limit is indicated on the computer screen for each section. If pretest questions ae included in a test section, additional time will be allotted to that section of the test. The Survey of the Natural Sciences and the Reading Comprehension Test are administered first. The Physics Test and the Quantitative Reasoning Test are administered after an optional 15 minute rest break.



The Survey of the Natural Sciences is an achievement test. The content is limited to those areas covered by an entire first-year course in biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry. The test contains a total of 100 items: 40 biology items, 30 general chemistry items and 30 organic chemistry items. The time limit of the test is 90 minutes. Although the three science sections are identified, it is important that the examinees pace themselves since separate sub scores will be given for each section.



The Reading Comprehension Test contains passages typical of the level of material encountered in the first year of optometry school. Each passage is followed by 10 to 17 items, which can be answered from a reading of the passage. One should not try to answer the questions until the passage is understood thoroughly. The time limit of the test is 50 minutes. Although these materials contain only one passage, the actual Reading Comprehension Test contains three passages and has a total of 40 items.



The Physics Test is also an achievement test. The content is limited to those areas covered in a two-semester physics course. The test contains a total of 40 items. The time limit of the test is 50 minutes.



The Quantitative Reasoning Test measures the examinees ability to reason with numbers, to manipulate numerical relationships, and to deal intelligently with quantitative materials. The test contains 40 items. The time limit of the test is 45 minutes. Calculators are not permitted.
Optometry Admission Test
Admission-Tests Optometry course outline

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OAT
Optometry Admission Test
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Answer: A
Question: 420
Which of the following is the most important structure related to microbial attachment to
cells?
A. Flagellum
B. Plasmid
C. Peptidoglycan
D. Glycocalix
Answer: D
Question: 421
Which of the following is not a gram-negative bug?
A. Clostridium perfringens
B. Vibrio cholerae
C. Escherichia coli
D. Bordetella pertussis
Answer: A
Question: 422
Which of the following is not true related to endotoxins?
A. Endotoxins are secreted from cells.
B. Can be linked to Meningococcemia
C. Produced by gram negative microorganisms
D. Can cause fever
Answer: A
Question: 423
Which of the following microorganisms stain well?
A. Escherichia coli
B. Legionella pneumophila
C. Treponema
D. Chlamydia
Answer: A
Question: 424
Which of the following microorganisms are not matched correctly with the appropriate
isolation media?
A. Fungi -Sabourand's agar
B. Neisseria gonorrhoeae -Pink colonies media
C. Haemophilus influenzae -Chocolate agar
D. Mycobacterium tuberculosis -Lowenstein-Jensen agar
Answer: B
Question: 425
Which of the following diseases and bacteria are matched up incorrectly?
A. Cellulitis -Pasteurella multocida
B. Tularemia -Francisella tularensis
C. Gastritis -Heliobacter pylori
D. Lyme disease -Yersinia pestis
Answer: D
Question: 426
Which of the following diseases and bacteria are matched up incorrectly?
A. Treponema pallidum -Syphilis
B. Tinea nigra -Cladosporium werneckii
C. Borrelia burgdorferi -Lyme disease
D. Yersinia enterocolitica -Diptheria
Answer: D
Question: 427
Which of the following is not true concerning Staphylococcus aureus?
A. s. aureus is related to inflammation.
B. s. aureus can cause pneumonia
C. s. aureus can lead to acute bacterial endocarditis
D. s. aureus does not make coagulase
Answer: D
Question: 428
Which of the following signs and symptoms is not linked to Haemophilus influenzae?
A. Otitis media
B. Pneumonia
C. Malaria
D. Epiglottis
Answer: C
Question: 429
The Tsetse fly is a transmission factor for which of the following organisms?
A. Trichomonas vaginalis
B. Trypanosoma gambiense
C. Entamoeba histolytica
D. Toxoplasma
Answer: B
Question: 430
The Ixodes tick is a transmission factor for which of the following organisms?
A. Trichomonas vaginalis
B. Leishmania donovani
C. Babesia
D. Giardia lamblia
Answer: C
Question: 431
Chagas' disease is commonly treated with Nifurtimox and is linked to the ____
microorganism.
A. Naegleria
B. Schistosoma
C. Wucheria bancrofti
D. Trypanosoma cruzi
Answer: D
Question: 432
Which of the following is not fungal related?
A. Cryptococcus neoformans
B. Candida albicans
C. Tinea nigra
D. Chlamydiae
Answer: D
Question: 433
Which of the following is not a DNA virus?
A. Adenovirus
B. Calicivirus
C. Papovirus
D. Poxvirus
Answer: B
Question: 434
Which of the following is not a RNA virus?
A. Reovirus
B. Orthomyxovirus
C. Deltavirus
D. Herpesvirus
Answer: D
Question: 435
Which of the following viruses is not a double strand linear DNA virus?
A. Poxvirus
B. Papovavirus
C. Adenovirus
D. Herpesvirus
Answer: B
Question: 436
Which of the following viruses is not a single strand linear RNA virus?
A. Togavirus
B. Retrovirus
C. Bunyavirus
D. Picornavirus
Answer: C
Question: 437
The Tzanck test is not used on which of the following viruses?
A. VZV
B. HSV-2
C. HHV-8
D. HSV-1
Answer: C
Question: 438
Which of the following microorganisms has not been linked to UTI's?
A. e. coli
B. Pseudomonas
C. Klebsiella
D. Haemophilus
Answer: D
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Admission-Tests Optometry course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/OAT Search results Admission-Tests Optometry course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/OAT https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Admissions Information

To be considered for admission, international students must have the academic, linguistic, and financial abilities to successfully complete the professional program. Specific requirements are as follows:

Academic Requirements
International applicants must fulfill the same undergraduate academic requirements as United States applicants.

Foreign Transcripts
International applicants are required to submit official foreign transcripts to an approved foreign transcript evaluation service for a course-by-course U.S. equivalency report. The official evaluation should then be sent to OptomCAS. We highly recommend that you contact the foreign transcript evaluation service as early as possible. The service may take several weeks to process your foreign transcript once it is received. Below is a list of commonly used and accepted evaluation services.

Testing and Interview Requirements

  • All applicants must take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT). Other accepted entrance exams includes the MCAT, DAT and PCAT.
  • If English is not the primary language, the student will be required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Visa Information
Students who are outside the US and admitted to the UAB School of Optometry must generally obtain an F-1 or J-1 student visa to enter the US to begin classes. The UAB Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) will assist you and provide the information necessary to obtain a visa after admission. Specific information on sponsorship and financial requirements can be obtained from:

International Student and Scholar Services
Melvin H. Sterne Library
917 13th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35294
Telephone (205) 934-3328
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wed, 30 Sep 2015 21:27:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/optometry/home/academics/doctor-of-optometry/admissions-information
Test-Optional Admission Policy

Admission and merit scholarship consideration for students who apply as test-optional is based on several factors, including high school GPA, grades in coursework required for university admission, and rigor/performance in advanced courses (AP, IB, Honors, etc.).

Consideration for students applying with a test score includes all the above plus their highest composite ACT or SAT score.

Mon, 16 Oct 2023 05:29:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/admissions/apply/test-optional
Optometry Degrees, Becoming an Optometrist No result found, try new keyword!Layman acknowledges that there is some crossover between the tasks that ophthalmologists and optometrists perform, since ophthalmologists frequently conduct vision tests and prescribe corrective ... Tue, 07 Sep 2021 02:32:00 -0500 https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/how-to-become-an-optometrist-and-tips-on-optometry-school COE Admissions Outline COE Admissions Outline

Fall Admissions Outline

Elementary & Special, Middle Grades, P-12 Art and Music Education Majors

  • December-January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June
  • July
  • Apply online.
  • Make sure you complete all forms within the application by the close of the admission window.
  • Refer back to your application to review feedback when a form is declined. Make sure you submit the necessary documentation ASAP.
  • Students applying for fall admissions must have a 2.75 overall GPA to enter the bachelor’s program, and this must be met by the end of the summer semester of your application year.
    • GPA's between 2.5 - 2.74 are considered, please contact coeundergrads@ung.edu for additional information.
  • If you are eligible for spring admittance and still finishing up your coursework, you will be “provisionally admitted” until grades are posted for the remaining incomplete courses (spring and summer). 
  • Upon admissions to the College of Education, the undergraduate admissions office requires that you must maintain a documented, overall (UNG and Transfer) grade point average of 3.0
  • You will be notified via UNG email regarding your admission status within 2 to 3 weeks after the application closes.
  • Refer to the UNG calendar for Winter Break information. No correspondence will be sent during this time.
  • Read all correspondence thoroughly from this point forward and immediately respond if contacted. Check your “junk mail” since UNG may not recognize an email from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
  • Please note the application process has multiple steps with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC):
    • Sign and return your admissions letter to accept your spot in the program.
    • Claim UNG as your program provider with the GaPSC when prompted through email.
    • Complete an online ‘Pre-service Application’ when prompted through email.
    • When issued, locate your Pre-Service Certificate through your MyPSC account.
  • Once each student has been notified of their acceptance status, their names will be shared with the Field Placement Director who will then begin the process of placing students.
  • Not all placements are sent out at the same time but our Field Placement Director will be in touch. This process takes time, and we thank you for your patience.
  • The Undergraduate Admissions Office will email information about major changes and course registration at the end of the month.
  • Do not worry if you are not registered for your fall College of Education sections by your assigned day and time, according to banner. Class totals are determined by the department, which means there is no concern of classes closing or your spot being lost.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for the Middle Grades Education Programs will be the student’s responsibility.
  • P-12 Music students will register for their courses based on advisor recommendations.
  • If accepted, you will be notified regarding which school / county you have been assigned to via email. Once your placement is made, you may not request to change your placement.
  • Not all placements are sent out at the same time but our Field Placement Director will be in touch. This process takes time and we thank you for your patience.
  • Take the time to review study aboard opportunities for senior year.
  • Please note: any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the spring semester for all student that applied for fall admissions. Student with concerns will be contacted individually.
  • Middle Grades Education: Be sure to check the class schedule and do not register for any content or core courses that might conflict with your program courses.
  • Once placements are made for ELE/SPED juniors, the Professional Development Community facilitator will contact you to attend a required orientation, which will prepare you for going into the schools for the fall semester.
  • Middle Grades Education juniors will be registered for MGED 3015. In this course, you will attend a fall orientation. Additional information will be sent via email from the Undergraduate Admissions Office.
  • Majors will be updated for students starting the fall semester. Review DegreeWorks_shared:links/banner-web after this change is made.
  • The Undergraduate Admissions Office will register students for all College of Education Sections listed on the plan of study in the summer.
  • All students accepted into educator preparation programs must pay the Field Placement Fee for each semester in which field–intensive course(s) are required in the program. This fee will be added to your invoice in addition to the regular tuition and fees assessed by the university.
  • Any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the summer semester for all student that applied for fall admissions. Student with concerns will be contacted individually.

Spring Admissions Outline

Secondary Education, Kinesiology with Teacher Certification and P-12 Music Education Majors

  • August
  • September
  • October
  • November
  • December
  • Apply online.
  • Make sure you complete all forms within the application by the close of the admission window.
  • Refer back to your application to review feedback when a form is declined. Make sure you submit the necessary documentation ASAP.
  • Students applying for fall admissions must have a 2.75 overall GPA to enter the bachelor’s program, and this must be met by the end of the summer semester of your application year.
    • GPA's between 2.5 - 2.74 are considered, please contact coeundergrads@ung.edu for additional information.
  • If you are eligible for spring admittance and still finishing up your coursework, you will be “provisionally admitted” until grades are posted for the remaining incomplete courses. 
  • Upon admissions to the College of Education, the undergraduate admissions office requires that you must maintain a documented, overall (UNG and Transfer) grade point average of 3.0.
  • You will be notified via UNG email regarding your admission status within 2 to 3 weeks.
  • Read all correspondence thoroughly from this point forward and immediately respond if contacted. Check your “junk mail” since UNG may not recognize an email from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
  • Please note the application process has multiple steps with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC):
    • Sign and return your admissions letter to accept your spot in the program.
    • Claim UNG as your program provider with the GaPSC when prompted through email. 
    • Complete an online ‘Pre-service Application’ when prompted through email. 
    • When issued, locate your Pre-Service Certificate through your MyPSC account.
  • Once each student has been notified of their acceptance status, their names will be shared with the Field Placement Director who will then begin the process of placing students.
  • If accepted, you will be notified regarding which school / county you have been assigned to via email. Once your placement is made, you may not request to change your placement.
  • Majors in secondary science programs will be updated for students starting the spring semester. Review DegreeWorks after this change is made.
  • Information about course registration is sent out to secondary programs. The Program Admissions Specialist (PAS) will register students for all College of Education sections listed on the plan of study.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for secondary education will be the student’s responsibility.
  • P-12 Kinesiology Teacher Certification students will register for their own courses based on advisor recommendations.
  • You will receive an email from the Undergraduate Admissions Office of when registration will occur since not all time tickets will open on the same date. Class totals are determined by the department, which means there is no concern of classes closing or your spot being lost. Do not worry if you are not registered by your assigned day and time, according to banner. 
  • You will receive an email after the change is made to your account or if there is a change to the registration time.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for secondary education will be the student’s responsibility.
  • All students accepted into educator preparation programs must pay the Field Placement Fee for each semester in which field–intensive course(s) are required in the program. This fee will be added to your invoice in addition to the regular tuition and fees assessed by the university.
  • Take the time to review study aboard opportunities for senior year.
  • Please note any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the fall semester for all student that applied for spring admissions. Students with concerns will be contacted individually.
  • Refer to the UNG calendar for Winter Break information. No correspondence will be sent during this time.

Disclaimer – The following outlines are subject to change based on PSC requirements.

Establishing Connection...

Tue, 07 Dec 2021 03:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://ung.edu/college-of-education/coe-admissions-outline.php MSci Optometry

Overview

Degree awarded
Master of Science (UG)
Duration
4 years
Typical A-level offer

AAB-AAA (including specific subjects).

Typical contextual A-level offer

AAB-ABB (including specific subjects).

Refugee/care-experienced offer

Applicants who have been in local authority care for more than three months or have refugee status may be eligible for an offer two grades below the standard requirements.

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

35 points overall with grades 665 in three higher level subjects, to include two sciences (from Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics).

For this course we will accept: Higher Level Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretation.

Full entry requirements

How to apply

Course overview

  • Gain a professional qualification to prepare you for your career in optometry.
  • Study in our modern optometry clinics at an institution with one of the longest traditions of teaching optometry in the UK.
  • Gain clinical experience at neighbouring Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, one of the largest eye hospitals in Europe.
  • Apply your learning to clinical cases from the start of the course.
  • The General Optical Council (GOC) regulates our BSc, and MSci (integrated Masters) Optometry courses. Both programmes hold full approval from the GOC.

Open days

Attending an open day is a great way to find out what studying optometry at Manchester is like. Find out about our upcoming open days.

We also operate campus tours, which are available most days. These are with a student ambassador who can tell you all about life at The University of Manchester. It may also be possible to meet with admissions staff (subject to staff availability). Family and friends are welcome too.

To book, please contact the Admissions Office on tel +44 (0)161 529 4563 or email ug.optometry@manchester.ac.uk

Fees

Tuition fees for home students commencing their studies in September 2024 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £25,500 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Additional expenses

The General Optical Council student registration fee is currently £30 (renewable each year) but is reimbursed to you by the University.

In your first year, we provide you with a set of clinical scrubs. During second year, you are encouraged to purchase your own ophthalmoscope and retinoscope (£1,300-£1,700).

You will have the opportunity to go on placement outside of the University. Depending on the location of the practice, this could incur additional costs.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Entry requirements

A-level

We require grades AAB-AAA, which should include two science subjects (Biology, Maths, Physics or Chemistry) normally to be taken in one sitting. We also require a pass in the practical assessments.

We will consider resit applications provided you have obtained a minimum of A-level grades BBB at the first attempt (or equivalent qualifications).

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available. Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application. Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

We require at least five GCSEs at minimum grade 5 (B), including English Language and Mathematics. We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSEs.

For applicants whose status has been confirmed as WP+ using the University's Contextual Data Eligibility tool, we will allow an overall reduction of 2 grades on the full GCSE requirements. Please note, however, that no individual subject should be lower than C/4.

For applicants whose status has been confirmed as WP++ using the University's Contextual Data Eligibility tool, we will allow an overall reduction of 4 grades on the full GCSE requirements. Please note, however, that no individual subject should be lower than C/4.

International Baccalaureate

35 points overall with grades 665 in three higher level subjects, to include two sciences (from Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics).

For this course we will accept: Higher Level Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretation.

Other international entry requirements

We welcome applications from overseas students. Country-specific information can be found on the University website.

Scottish requirements

We require grades AABBB to include two science subjects (Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Biology) together with grade B in an Advanced Higher science subject. If you have not studied National 5 qualifications, we would expect you to have studied English and mathematics at Higher level.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and we do require two A-levels or equivalent to be included within this (please see subject requirements for A-level).

We accept the Welsh Baccalaureate in place of the third A-level only.

European Baccalaureate

We require an overall grade of 83% with a minimum of grade 8 in two science subjects.

In addition, all applicants are required to demonstrate proficiency in English Language.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A-levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A-level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme in Science, are required to achieve AAB in Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics and an EAP score of B. INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester students are required to attend an interview.

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year in Science are required to achieve AAB in Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics and an EAP requirements score of B.

We consider your full educational background. A decision about your suitability for this course will not be taken based solely on the foundation year completed, and will include all prior qualifications. Applicants should pass the Foundation Year at the first attempt as resits may not be considered.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

BTEC National Extended Diploma

We do not consider the National Extended Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Extended Diploma must achieve DDD alongside one science A-level (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grade A.

BTEC National Diploma

We do not consider the National Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Diploma must achieve DD alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AB.

BTEC National Foundation Diploma

We do not consider the National Foundation Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Foundation Diploma must achieve D alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

BTEC National Extended Certificate

We do not consider the National Extended Certificate for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Extended Certificate must achieve D alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma must achieve DDD alongside one science A-level (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grade A.

Cambridge Technical Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Diploma must achieve DD alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AB.

Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma must achieve DD alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate must achieve D alongside two science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

Access to HE Diploma

We require 60 credits overall with 45 at Level 3, including a minimum of 15 credits in Biology with a Distinction grade, plus a minimum of 15 credits in Chemistry with a Distinction grade and a further 15 credits with Distinction.

Applicants should also have GCSE English Language at grade 5 (B) or above and GCSE Maths at grade 5 (B) or above, or equivalent. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual basis. We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSEs.

Students educated up to GCSE level who have only taken a one-year Access course will not normally be accepted.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken to include two science subjects (Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics). Grades required will be D3-M2 and/or A-B.

T Level

We do not accept T Levels as entry onto this course. The University does accept specific T Level qualifications on a number of courses please review to our T Level information page for a full list.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (eg AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies).

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We will accept grade B in Core Mathematics in lieu of the correct grade in GCSE Mathematics.

Home-schooled applicants

If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences. Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest. There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.

The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates. If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to. Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

We require one of:

  • GCSE, IGCSE or O-Level English Language at grade 5 (B). We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSE;
  • IELTS 7 (with no less than 6.5 in any component);
  • TOEFL (iBT) - 100;
  • an equivalent qualification.

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Advice to applicants

We would normally only consider applicants who obtained the relevant qualification within the three years prior to entry.

If your most recent qualification was taken more than three years ago, please contact the Admissions Office. We will consider each application individually and may require you to submit further information, such as transcripts and details of employment.

Applicants should contact the Admissions Office to discuss their particular circumstances.

Please note that if you are offered a place on this course, you will be required to register with the General Optical Council and, as a result, will be subject to their standards and disciplinary proceedings in addition to those of the University.

Fitness to practise / health requirements

All applicants will be required to complete a Pre-acceptance Health Questionnaire. Please see the Optometry Applicants - Fitness to Practise Guidelines (PDF) and HEOPS Student Fitness Standards for more information.

Vaccinations

Previous guidance regarding mandatory vaccination for Covid for courses with a clinical or healthcare placement has been paused, in line with government advice. However both NHS England and NHS Improvement view getting vaccinated for healthcare staff and students as a professional duty. We therefore continue to highly recommend all students on this course to take up their COVID-19 vaccinations as soon as they are eligible.

How your application is considered

Both international and EU applicants are considered on the basis of their UCAS form. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed via Zoom.

Interview requirements

Interviews are part of the selection process. All suitable UK applicants will be interviewed via Zoom. Please refer to the application process page for more information.

Overseas (non-UK) applicants

Full guidance on how to apply for a visa to study at the University can be found on the Visa guidance page. Most international students will obtain a student visa for the three-year duration of the BSc Optometry course. Once you complete the MSci Optometry, you can then apply for a graduate route (post study) visa if you would like to continue working in the UK.

Fitness to practise / health requirements

Communication and dress code

We have adopted the same policy regarding dress code as set out by the General Medical Council (GMC). The GMC states that non-verbal communication is at least as important as verbal communication, and so how a student or Optometrist appears to patients, relatives or colleagues means as much as what he or she says.

Students (and optometrists) in professional settings must dress in a manner that adds to, and does not detract from, effective communication.

Furthermore, the Standards for Optical Students states that students must learn how to listen to patients and their carers, and communicate effectively with them in a way they can understand.

This applies not only in clinical settings, but also throughout the educational elements of the undergraduate course, which is built around group work with other students and tutors.

In addition, the convention of some units may require wearing scrubs and being bare below the elbow. Hair should be tied back if it interferes with, or adds risk, to a clinical activity. Nail polish and gel nails are an infection risk and are not permitted in any clinical areas. Students must abide by all workplace dress codes when on placement, which may vary between sites.

You must be able to participate fully in communication and other skills training, discussion and assessment. As well as adhering to the dress code above, it means being able to interact fully with patients, standardised patients, teachers and examiners of any cultural or ethnic background or either gender. This includes conducting physical examinations that are a compulsory component of the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service check

We do not require applicants to complete an enhanced Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) check during the admissions cycle.

However should you register on the Optometry course, you will be required to complete the enhanced DBS check during the first semester of formal teaching.

International applicants will need to submit an overseas police check and this will be included as a formal offer condition.

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Requests for deferred entry are granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and are normally granted for one year only. Some English Language test results, such as IELTS or TOEFL, are only valid for two years from the test date.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We will consider resit applications provided you have obtained a minimum of A-level grades BBB at the first attempt (or equivalent qualifications).

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry. In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course. If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Course details

Course description

The Manchester MSci Optometry course will enable you to gain the knowledge and skills required to register as a UK optometrist.

The course uses mixed learning methods, but the key Manchester approach is the study of themed patient cases in an active learning environment that will allow you to integrate scientific understanding, clinical skills and professional skills throughout the course. Facilitated group activities will emphasise enquiry, discussion, self-education, and the development of critical faculties and communication skills, all essential skills for healthcare professionals.

You will cover a broad spectrum of industry-relevant study areas that prepare you for work as a professional optometrist, including:

  • the key principles of optics;
  • clinical optics and treating eye and vision disorders;
  • ocular function and structure;
  • the science of vision.

We provide a supportive and inclusive learning environment, with each year group looked after by a team of academics and clinicians. Theory assessments are focused on clinical cases and are taken at the end of an academic year, with plenty of opportunity to practise beforehand. Practical skills are monitored and assessed throughout the year rather than using a single set of high-pressure practical tests.

You will meet volunteer patients in your first year and then receive clinical experience in our university optometry clinics from the second year, seeing real patients and working in teams with students from across the course. You will also have the opportunity to gain clinical experience in a wide range of settings external to the University, for example in community, hospital, and domiciliary practice. In your final two years, you can choose to focus on a specialist area of optometry.

Please note this course is subject to approval. 

Aims

Our course integrates science and clinical learning, so you can apply scientific knowledge, decision-making and critical thinking, and the latest concepts to your clinical practice. We will foster your leadership abilities, and your commitment to continuing professional development after graduation.

Upon graduation, you will be able to apply knowledge to understand and manage the complex healthcare needs of individuals and society. You will also develop the resilience to meet the demands of changing healthcare environments. You will have the practical and professional skills needed to practise person centred optometry.

You will meet the requirements of the General Optical Council to register as a UK optometrist.

Special features

Unique clinical experience

Gain experience at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, one of Europe's biggest eye teaching hospitals, to learn about the management and treatment of eye disease.

Early patient contact

Start to meet volunteer patients in Year 1 and begin to work with real patients in the Manchester Optometry Clinics from Year 2 onwards.

Close-knit student cohort

Join the active student-run Optometry Society to take part in formal and informal social activities.

Integrated master's

Direct registration with the General Optical Council on successful completion of the course.

Opportunity to specialise

Specialise in a clinical or academic area in your final year.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, clinics and practical sessions. Students learn by applying their knowledge to cases in groups in both simulated and real environments.

Coursework and assessment

Subjects are taught throughout the year will be examined at the end of the second semester. To progress between years and to successfully graduate, students must demonstrate competence in specified clinical practical skills.

The final degree classification is based on marks obtained during all years of the course, weighted as follows:

  • Year 1 - 6%
  • Year 2 - 19%
  • Year 3 - 37.5%
  • Year 4 - 37.5%

Course content for year 1

In Semester 1, you'll gain the skills needed to flourish in your new academic environment, getting ready for successful study and fulfilling university life. You'll then be introduced to the scientific principles behind optometry, including light properties, eye anatomy, and how the brain processes vision. In partnership with your fellow students, you will apply the knowledge you have acquired to clinical cases, considering the ethical and legal dimensions in addition to the scientific aspects. Attending practical sessions will enable you to develop your ability to use optometric instruments and assess ocular function.

In Semester 2, you will build upon the foundational skills and knowledge you've gained, exploring the scientific, legal and ethical principles of optometry in greater depth. In interactive sessions with your peers, you'll have the chance to put your learning into practice. You will further enhance your ability to use optometric instruments in preparation for placements where you will see real patients in your second year.

Course content for year 2

In Semester 3, you will explore a variety of exciting new subjects, including human disease processes, pharmacology, contact lens practice, and binocular vision. Working with your peers, you will apply this knowledge to clinical cases. Additionally, you will enhance your understanding of optics, ophthalmic appliances, and optometric instrumentation. As part of a team, you will have the opportunity to apply your clinical skills while working with students from different academic years and treating real patients at the Manchester Optometry Clinic.

In Semester 4, you will work with your peers to further expand your knowledge of subjects from Semester 3 in the context of clinical cases. As a member of the Manchester Optometry clinical team, you will have the opportunity to apply your clinical skills while working with students from different academic years and treating real patients in our state-of-the-art clinical facility. There will also be opportunities for short clinical placements external to the University.

Course content for year 3

From Semester 5, you will spend more of your time learning from your clinical contacts with patients. The majority of your time will be spent actively engaging with patients at the Manchester Optometry Clinics, taking on greater responsibilities within the clinician team. You will have the opportunity to participate in different clinics at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital.

There will also be opportunities for short clinical placements external to the University. As you progress, you will apply clinical and scientific research to your patient management, becoming an evidence-based practitioner. Furthermore, you will critically examine the influence of technology, including artificial intelligence, on the future landscape of optometry.

In Semester 6, you will build further on your ability to lead on personalised patient management within the Manchester Optometry Clinics in an evidence-based way, aided by technology. There will also be opportunities for short clinical placements external to the University. You will work towards being trusted in key clinical areas in preparation for your final year.

Course content for year 4

In Semesters 7 and 8, you will have the chance to specialise in a clinical or scientific area. You will also continue to develop your clinical abilities as you spend most of your time in the Manchester Optometry Clinics, Manchester Royal Eye Hospital or on external placements. You will work towards being trusted in all the core areas of optometric practice to enable you to graduate and join the GOC register at the end of the academic year.

Throughout Semesters 7 and 8, you will apply the basic scientific knowledge and clinical skills you acquired in the earlier years and demonstrate your growing professional acumen as an optometrist. Your clinical placements will also give you the opportunity to learn how a health service works, and understand and experience the role of an optometrist as a first point of contact for patients in the primary care practice.

What our students say

“I have always wanted to be an optometrist, and am absolutely delighted to have had the opportunity to study at Manchester. The learning experience is remarkable, with first-rate lectures and practical teaching delivered by practising optometrists, ophthalmologists, and researchers at the cutting edge of development in vision and optometric study.” Sean Matthews.

“I really enjoyed the practicals. They are great for getting to know others in your year, and the majority of the supervisors are practising optometrists, so learning from them provides an invaluable insight into how it is done in practice. Having patients from the first year also vastly improves your clinical and communication skills, and the patients aren't as scary as you might think!” Sophie Godley.

Find out more about what it's like to study at Manchester on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog.

Facilities

You will learn in purpose-built facilities that include a dispensing clinic, 16 bespoke optometric examination rooms, numerous dedicated specialist clinic rooms and dedicated laboratories for non-clinical practical sessions.

Take a look at the optometry facilities tour.

You will also have access to the University's other facilities for undergraduates.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

Optometrists work in high street practice or hospital eye clinics, where they:

  • prescribe and dispense spectacles and contact lenses;
  • provide low vision rehabilitation;
  • treat problems with binocular vision;
  • monitor ocular disease.

Optometrists are now also involved in the primary care of patients with diseases such as diabetes and glaucoma. They can also undertake postgraduate study to become independent prescribers with the authority to treat a range of eye conditions.

After registration with the General Optical Council, you can take your career forward in private practice or within the National Health Service. Of our recent graduates, 95% are working in private practice and 5% in the NHS.

See a blog post from one of our graduates who is now working as an optometrist on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog.

Accrediting organisations

Optometry degrees are approved by the General Optical Council and the course must abide by their standards and demonstrate their outcomes.

It is a legal requirement to maintain GOC student registration throughout your studies.

Tue, 04 Jul 2023 20:47:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2024/21273/msci-optometry/all-content/ Test Optional

Choosing Test-Optional at SCU

Santa Clara University is extending its “test-optional” policy for first-year and transfer students until 2024. Scores on the SAT or ACT are not required for students applying to Santa Clara University for the 2024 term. As a test-optional university, students still have the option to submit any standardized test score results they’ve received. A student who chooses not to submit standardized test scores will be at no disadvantage in our admission or merit scholarship review processes.

For the 2023 application cycle:

  • 36% of SCU applicants submitted a test
  • 41% of admitted students submitted a test

Where does an applicant select having ACT/SAT scores reviewed or not?

On the Common Application Supplement Questions for SCU, the following question will be required of all first-year applicants: Do you want your test scores considered?

Are other test scores like SAT II Subject Tests, AP exam scores, IB exam scores, A-levels exam scores, etc. required in the admission review process?

Santa Clara does not require submission of these scores for admission application evaluation. If students would like to report scores, they have the option to share scores through their Common Application.

How do we evaluate applications?

At Santa Clara University, we review applications holistically, meaning that we will review your application individually, taking into account your academic credentials as well as your personal qualities. Important required pieces of your application include your transcript, course rigor, unweighted GPA, extracurricular activities, Common App essay, supplemental questions, and demonstrated interest. Test scores are treated as optional information, similar to a resume or an additional letter of recommendation.

What if I’m applying for Fall 2025 or later?

Santa Clara University is still reviewing the test-optional policy for future years.

Can an applicant who is deferred or waitlisted change their testing choice?

An applicant with a deferred or Wait List decision will have the opportunity to submit supplemental information, including test scores, an updated transcript, letter of interest, or additional letters of recommendations. It will not be required or expected to submit test scores.

What should I know as an international student?

You still have the test-optional choice. All international applicants are required to demonstrate a minimum level of English language. You can view our Undergraduate English Proficiency website to see the several ways to demonstrate English proficiency in the application for admission, which include proficiency exams like IELTS, TOEFL, Duolingo or standardized tests like SAT or ACT.

Does Santa Clara Superscore?

Yes. Students who choose to submit their test scores have the option to submit multiple scores. SCU is interested in your best achievement, so sending us multiple tests, if available, allows us to see subsections regardless of test date or test type (ACT/SAT).

How does this affect merit scholarships and institutional financial aid awards?

It doesn’t! All students are reviewed for merit scholarships, whether they applied with or without a test score. About the top 15% of our applicants receive merit scholarships on the basis of a holistic review process. A student who chooses not to submit standardized test scores will be at no disadvantage in our merit scholarship review processes. It’s up to you.

Testing Deadlines

Students who choose to have their scores considered must take the exam by the appropriate application deadline:

  Early Action & Early Decision I Regular Decision & Early Decision II
Common Application & Supplement Deadline November 1 January 7
Last Accepted SAT Test Date October December
Last Accepted ACT Test Date September* December

 *We cannot ensure October ACT test results will reach our office in time for Early Action and Early Decision I review.

Reporting Test Scores

We accept the following options to complete the test scores requirement by the application deadline:

  • Self-report your scores in the Self-Reported Test Score form in the Application Status Portal
  • Send your official test scores from the testing agency

If you receive updated test results after submitting the Self-Reported Test Scores form, you can self-report these newer scores by filling out the form again.

Enrolling at SCU

If you are offered admission to Santa Clara University and choose to enroll, official test scores that match your self-reported scores will need to be received by your deposit deadline. In order for test scores to be considered official, they must be sent directly from College Board or ACT. Santa Clara University reserves the right to revoke admission if an applicant’s self-reported scores do not match their official score report.

For enrolling students who did not select to have test scores considered in the admission review process, SCU will ask for official scores after matriculation if scores are available. The scores will be used for assessment of the test optional program.

Fri, 17 Mar 2023 14:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scu.edu/admission/undergraduate/first-year-students/test-optional/
Standardized Test Policy

Connecticut College is test-optional.

We don’t require applicants to submit standardized test scores because we think there are better ways to determine if you’ll be successful at Conn. And we want you to highlight your strengths in the application process, not write about a random topic we've assigned. We believe your high school transcript, essay, recommendations or other application materials may show your strengths better than test scores.

How to decide whether to submit your test scores

Our advice is to submit your scores if you feel they are representative of your achievement and will enhance your application. (Review the middle 50% range of scores submitted for the Class of 2024.) However, if you feel your standardized test scores do not reflect your full potential and elect not to submit them, you will not be at a disadvantage in the admission process.

In the Common App, simply choose which one testing score option you'd like us to consider:

  • No tests
  • SAT Reasoning Test (essay is not required)
  • ACT (writing component is not required)

If you want to submit your test scores

If you would like us to consider your tests scores as part of your application, note that we accept both official and self-reported test scores.

Official test scores can be submitted in any of the following ways:

  • Directly from the testing agency (SAT and ACT).
  • By your high school counselor via email (admission@conncoll.edu) or fax (860-439-4301).
  • By your high school counselor via official transcript.

Self-reported test scores can be submitted in either of the following ways:

  • Enter scores in the testing section of the Common Application.
  • Submit screenshots or scanned copies of score reports via email (admission@conncoll.edu) or fax (860-439-4301).

If you submit self-reported scores, please note that your official test scores will be required upon enrollment. Any discrepancies from self-reported test scores may result in rescinding our offer of admission.

We “superscore” the SAT Reasoning Test and use the combined highest composite score from the ACT. You should send scores from every SAT/ACT date for which you received your best scores in specific sections.

Scores from standardized tests taken through November typically arrive in time for Early Decision I consideration. Tests taken in December will arrive in time for Early Decision II and Regular Decision applicants.

Transfer Testing

Standardized test scores are not considered in the transfer application process.

English Proficiency Requirement

Conn's standardized testing policy does not apply to testing for purposes of demonstrating English proficiency. Students whose first language is not English must submit the TOEFL, IELTS, Duolingo or PTE.

Sun, 16 Aug 2020 22:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.conncoll.edu/admission/apply/standardized-test-policy/
Test-Optional Policy 2023-24

Learn more about our test-optional policy:

Can I switch my testing plan after submitting my Common Application?

Students who submit standardized test results to Boston College and indicate on their applications that they wish to have scores considered will be unable to switch their application to test-optional at a later point in time. Once scores become part of a student's file, they cannot be removed.

Students who apply as test-optional candidates and later wish to have the Admission Committee consider their standardized test results may request to do so in writing at bcapplicant@bc.edu. For full consideration, students should contact us directly as close to our deadlines as possible.

Does this policy apply to international students?

Yes. International students are still required to demonstrate English language proficiency via TOEFL, IELTS, or Duoligo English Test results. This English language proficiency requirement may be waived for students who speak English as their native language, have attended a US high school for at least three years in a non-ESOL curriculum, or submit standardized test results including scores of 650 or greater on the SAT EBRW or 29 or greater on the ACT English section. Learn more here.

Does this policy apply to home-schooled students?

Yes. However, because the Admission Committee has little context in which to evaluate home-schooled students’ academic results, standardized test results are extremely helpful to the Admission Committee. Home-schooled applicants are strongly encouraged to submit standardized test scores that allow us to put their applications in context with others in our pool. Other quantitative measures that students may also benefit from submitting include AP exam scores and/or college coursework. Official college transcripts should be submitted for all college courses completed.

Does this policy apply to athletic recruits?

Yes. The NCAA has removed the test score requirement for athletic eligibility in Division I sports. Recruited athletes are responsible for ensuring their NCAA eligibility.

Thu, 30 Nov 2023 21:45:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/admission/apply/test-optional.html
Best GMAT Prep Courses

Final Verdict

Overall, Magoosh is our top choice because it offers an extensive GMAT prep course for a reasonable price. The $249 course includes a year of access to course materials and comes with a 50-point score improvement guarantee. It’s not the cheapest or the most robust course, but it does a good job of balancing cost and value for future GMAT test-takers.

If you plan to take the GMAT, a GMAT prep course or study guide may be an essential resource. Some students may get by with only a test prep book, but online classes with live help, practice exams, and large libraries of practice questions help others achieve a higher score. Magoosh does a good job of catering to various learning styles and needs without breaking the bank.

Compare the Best GMAT Prep Courses

Company  Price  Platform  Guarantee  Duration 
Magoosh Best Overall $219, $249, $599 Online 50 points 1-year access
GMAT Official Starter Kit Best Free Course Free  Online  None  Unlimited 
Kaplan Best Online Course  $999 or $1,599  Online self-paced or online live instruction (in-person also available)  Score improvement  6 months 
Princeton Review Best In-Person Course  $1,399 to $1,999*  Live online or in-person instruction  Score improvement or 700+ score (depends on course)  1.5 months of class plus materials for longer
TestMasters Best Score Improvement Guarantee $899 to $2,999  Online, classroom, or private one-on-one 100 points  4 months 
PrepScholar Best on a Budget  $99 to $399**  Online  60 points  2 to 4 months 

*Discounted to $1,299-$1,699 as of March 2023. ** Discounted to $69-$259 as of March 2023.

How to Choose the Best GMAT Prep Course

To pick the best GMAT prep courses, it’s a good idea to look at course materials, the number of practice exams and questions, cost, score improvement guarantees, and duration as top factors.

  • Course materials: The quality and type of materials are essential in learning what you need to succeed on the GMAT.
  • Number of resources: Each provider has a varying number of practice exams, sample questions, and other resources.
  • Price: Cost is a big factor in the course you choose, though it’s a relatively low factor due to the overall cost of taking the GMAT and earning an MBA.
  • Score improvement guarantee: Score improvement guarantees indicate the quality of instruction and success of past students.
  • Duration: Longer course durations give you more time to prepare and study.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a GMAT Prep Course Worth It?

GMAT prep courses are not the only way to study for the GMAT, but they are an important option for many future GMAT participants. GMAT prep courses are worthwhile to anyone who wants to do better on the GMAT exam and doesn't trust themselves to study well using only books and other non-course resources. Depending on your needs, there’s likely a GMAT prep course that meets your budget, schedule, and learning style.

What Is the GMAT?

The GMAT is the Graduate Management Admissions Test. This test is the standard entrance exam for Masters in Business Administration (MBA) programs worldwide. The GMAT is a computer-based test including multiple-choice questions and an essay section. GMAT scores range from 200 to 800, with an average score of around 575. Every university has different MBA admission requirements, so you should check your desired programs for typical undergraduate grades and GMAT scores for admission.

How Do GMAT Prep Courses Help Improve Test Scores?

GMAT prep courses teach both the content included in the GMAT test and test-taking skills to help you succeed with the GMAT format. Class-style instruction, practice tests, and sample questions prepare future GMAT takers with the knowledge and skills to earn their best possible score on the exam. Depending on the GMAT prep course you choose, you may get a score improvement guarantee of up to 100 points over past attempts.

How Much Do GMAT Prep Courses Cost?

While there are free GMAT preparation resources available, most GMAT-bound individuals would likely benefit from a paid GMAT prep course. Among the courses we reviewed, costs ranged from $69 for basic, self-guided online programs to around $3,000 for a one-on-one, personalized course experience. Quality courses start at about $250 for online, self-guided lessons and materials. Many course providers offer additional tutoring and one-on-one instruction for an additional cost.

Methodology

To pick the best GMAT prep courses, we looked at the details of 10 popular course providers, focusing on materials, cost, duration, and learner outcomes. Courses with extensive question banks, multiple practice exams, and long durations fared best in our ratings. The cost was a factor but carried less weight, as MBA programs may cost as much as six figures, and GMAT prep is a relatively small expense, even in the $3,000 range. Only well-reputed test preparation companies were included in our final results.

Sun, 17 Dec 2023 01:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/best-gmat-prep-courses-5191448
Law School Admission Test

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a 3 1/2 hour standardized test that is comprised of reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, and logical reasoning questions. The purpose of the LSAT is to show law schools that applicants possesses skills in each of the areas that are essential to a student’s success in law school.

The LSAT is an integral part of the law school admission process and is required on all applications. The test is administered four times each year through LSAC at designated testing centers.

Divided into five 35-minute sections of multiple-choice questions, the LSAT focuses on five specific sections that have been allocated accordingly, (1) Reading Comprehension Section
(2) Analytical Reasoning Section 
(3) Two Logical Reasoning Sections

In addition to these four sections is an unscored fifth section that would complete the multiple-choice questions. The unscored section, also known as the variable section, typically is used to pretest new test questions or prepare new test forms. This section of the test will not be disclosed until you receive your results. The placement of each section throughout the test will be spastic and vary based on the test. Furthermore, a 35-minute, unscored writing sample is administered at the end of the test. The unscored writing sample is sent to each law school as part of the application.

The LSAC describes the design of the LSAT to be, “to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school: the reading and comprehension of complex texts with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to think critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reasoning and arguments of others.”

All students should only take the LSAT once they feel fully prepared.

The test is administered four times a year leaving flexibility for students who do not feel fully prepared. Students who have selected a test date should begin preparing at minimum 3 – 6 months prior to the test date.

Students are able to access free LSAT preparation materials through CamelLink and LSAC.org. These preparation materials include sample questions with explanations, test preparation videos, the ability to familiarize yourself with test instructions and question types, and practice tests. The use of these materials is highly encouraged.

Thu, 17 Oct 2019 22:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.conncoll.edu/career/prepare/pre-professional-advising/pre-law-advising-and-preparation/applying-to-law-school/law-school-admission-test-lsat/




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