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Exam Code: IIA-CRMA Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA) approach January 2024 by Killexams.com team

IIA-CRMA Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA)

Title: Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA)

Test Detail:
The Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA) is offered by the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA). It is a globally recognized certification that validates the knowledge and skills required to assess and manage risks within organizations. The CRMA certification focuses on risk management and assurance, providing professionals with the expertise to navigate complex risk environments effectively.

Course Outline:
The CRMA certification program covers a comprehensive range of topics related to risk management and assurance. The course provides participants with an in-depth understanding of risk assessment methodologies, risk management frameworks, and the role of internal auditors in risk management. The following is a general outline of the key areas covered in the certification program:

1. Introduction to Risk Management:
- Understanding the concepts and principles of risk management
- Identifying and categorizing different types of risks
- Roles and responsibilities of risk management professionals
- Integration of risk management into organizational processes
- Regulatory and compliance considerations

2. Risk Assessment and Analysis:
- Conducting risk assessments and identifying risk sources
- Risk appetite and tolerance determination
- Risk analysis techniques and tools
- Evaluating the impact and likelihood of risks
- Risk prioritization and mitigation strategies

3. Risk Management Frameworks and Standards:
- Overview of risk management frameworks (e.g., COSO, ISO 31000)
- Application of risk management standards and guidelines
- Implementing a risk management framework within an organization
- Roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders in risk management
- Monitoring and reporting on risk management effectiveness

4. Internal Audit's Role in Risk Management:
- Internal audit's contribution to risk management processes
- Performing risk-based internal audits
- Internal control frameworks and their relationship to risk management
- Leveraging technology for risk management and assurance
- Collaborating with stakeholders to enhance risk management practices

Exam Objectives:
The CRMA certification exam assesses candidates' understanding of risk management principles, processes, and internal audit's role in risk management. The exam objectives include, but are not limited to:

1. Demonstrating knowledge of risk management principles and concepts.
2. Understanding risk assessment and analysis techniques.
3. Applying risk management frameworks and standards.
4. Recognizing the role of internal audit in risk management.
5. Implementing effective risk management practices.

Syllabus:
The CRMA certification program typically includes self-study materials or training courses provided by the IIA or authorized training providers. The syllabus provides a breakdown of the topics covered throughout the course, including specific learning objectives and milestones. The syllabus may include the following components:

- Introduction to Risk Management
- Risk Assessment and Analysis
- Risk Management Frameworks and Standards
- Internal Audit's Role in Risk Management
- Exam Preparation and Practice Tests
- Final Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA) Exam
Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA)
IIA Certification approach

Other IIA exams

CCSA Certification in Control Self-Assessment (IIA-CCSA)
CFSA Certified Financial Services Auditor (IIA-CFSA)
IIA-CIA-Part1 Certified Internal Auditor - Part 1, The Internal Audit Activitys Role in Governance, Risk, and Control
IIA-CIA-Part2 Certified Internal Auditor - Part 2, Conducting the Internal Audit Engagement
IIA-CIA-Part3 Certified Internal Auditor - Part 3, Business Analysis and Information Technology
IIA-ACCA ACCA CIA Challenge
IIA-CRMA Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA)
IIA-CIA-Part3-3P Business Knowledge for Internal Auditing
IIA-CRMA-ADV Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA Advanced)

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Question: 125
Why are preventative controls generally preferred to detective controls?
A . Because preventive controls promote doing the right thing in the first place, and lessen the need for corrective
action.
B . Because preventive controls are more sensitive and identify more exceptions than detective controls.
C . Because preventive controls include output procedures, which cover the full range of possible reviews,
reconciliations and analysis.
D . Because preventive controls identify exceptions after-the-fact, allowing them to be used after the entire review is
complete and therefore finding exceptions that detective controls may have missed.
Answer: A
Question: 126
A chief audit executive (CAE) learns that the brother-in-law of a senior auditor who audits the procurement process
was hired as the head of the procurement department six months prior.
Which of the following is the most appropriate action for the CAE to take?
A . The CAE should not interfere because there is no evidence that a conflict of interest has occurred.
B . The CAE should remind the senior auditor of his obligation to be objective and impartial.
C . The CAE should change the senior auditors assignment and take corrective action for the auditors failure to
disclose the conflict of interest.
D . The CAE should require the senior auditor to disclose the relationship in writing before continuing his
responsibility for monitoring procurement.
Answer: C
Question: 127
While reviewing the workpapers of a new auditor, the auditor in charge discovered that additional audit procedures
might be necessary.
According to IIA guidance, which of the following would be most relevant for the auditor in charge to consider when
making this decision?
A . Resource management.
B . Coordination.
C . Due professional care.
D . Engagement supervision.
Answer: C
Question: 128
A manufacturing organization discovers that the waste water released has failed to meet permitted limits.
Which control function will be least effective in correcting the issue?
A . Performing a chemical analysis of the water, prior to discharge, for components specified in the permit.
B . Posting signs that tell employees which substances may be disposed of via sinks and floor drains within the
facility.
C . Diluting pollutants by flushing sinks and floor drains daily with large volumes of clean water.
D . Establishing a preventive maintenance program for the pretreatment system.
Answer: C
Question: 129
According to the Standards, for how long should internal auditors who have previously performed or had management
responsibility for an operation wait to become involved in future internal audit activity with that same operation?
A . Three months.
B . Six months.
C . One year.
D . Two years.
Answer: C
Question: 130
According to IIA guidance, which of the following statements regarding the internal audit charter is true?
A . Senior management should approve the charter before it is submitted to the board.
B . The charter should describe the purpose and authority of the internal audit activity, consistent with the Standards.
C . The charter should define the consulting services that the internal audit activity is permitted to perform.
D . The CEO periodically should assess whether the terms of the charter continue to be adequate.
Answer: A
Question: 131
A new chief audit executive (CAE) of a large internal audit activity (IAA) is dissatisfied with the current amount and
quality of training being provided to the staff and wishes to implement improvements.
According to IIA guidance, which of the following actions would best help the CAE reach this objective?
A . Require that all staff obtain a minimum of two relevant audit certifications.
B . Perform a gap analysis of the IAAs existing knowledge, skills and competencies.
C . Engage a consultant to benchmark the IAAs training program against its peers.
D . Assign one experienced manager to better coordinate staff training and development activities.
Answer: B
Question: 132
An internal audit activity (IAA) provided assurance services for an activity it was responsible for during the preceding
year.
As a result, which IIA Code of Ethics principle is presumed to be impaired?
A . Competence.
B . Flexibility.
C . Objectivity.
D . Independence.
Answer: C
Question: 133
The internal audit supervisor is reviewing the workpapers prepared by the staff.
According to the Standards, which of the following statements regarding workpaper supervision is not true?
A . Review notes of questions that arise during the review process must be retained.
B . Dating and initialing each workpaper provides evidence of review.
C . Workpaper review allows for staff training and development.
D . Workpapers may be amended during the review process.
Answer: A
Question: 134
A government agencys policy states that board members travel and hospitality expenses must be audited annually.
Which of following people or groups is most appropriate to perform this audit?
A . The governments independent auditor.
B . The external auditors from an accounting firm.
C . The internal audit activity.
D . The agencys chief compliance officer.
Answer: A
Question: 135
The chief audit executive (CAE) of a mid-sized pharmaceutical organization has operational responsibility for the
regulatory compliance function. The audit committee requests an assessment of regulatory compliance.
According to IIA guidance, which of the following is the CAEs best course of action?
A . Have a proficient internal audit staff member perform the assessment and disclose the impairment in the audit
report and to the board.
B . Have a regulatory compliance staff member perform a self-assessment, to be reviewed by a proficient internal
auditor.
C . Have a proficient internal audit staff member perform the audit and report the results of the assessment directly to
senior management and the board.
D . Contract with a third-party entity or external auditor to complete the assessment and report the results to senior
management and the board.
Answer: D
Question: 136
Which of the following is not one of the 10 core competencies identified in the IIA Competency Framework?
A . Governance, risk, and control.
B . Performance management.
C . Business acumen.
D . Internal audit delivery.
Answer: B
Question: 137
According to IIA guidance, which of the following objectives of an assurance engagement for the organizations risk
management process is valid?
A . All risks have been identified and mitigated.
B . Risks have been accurately analyzed and evaluated.
C . All controls are both adequate and efficient.
D . The board is appropriately addressing intolerable risks.
Answer: B
Question: 138
Which of the following is the most effective strategy to manage the risk of foreign exchange losses due to sales to
foreign customers?
A . Hire a risk consultant.
B . Implement a hedging strategy.
C . Maintain a large foreign currency balance.
D . Insist that customers only pay in a stable currency.
Answer: B
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IIA Certification approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IIA-CRMA Search results IIA Certification approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IIA-CRMA https://killexams.com/exam_list/IIA Why Your Traditional Approach To Learning And Development Won't Cut It In The 2020s

Most organizations, and managers, believe that ongoing learning and development for their people is important for their growth, improved performance and overall business success. As a result, companies around the world invest significantly in training each year, with over $366 billion spent in 2018. Training budgets increased significantly in 2019, and research suggests that the role of learning and development (L&D) will broaden in 2020.

However, despite this belief, focus and investment, many organizations fail at implementing the type of learning culture and training experience that will truly elevate performance and provide significant returns on investment (ROIs). While most managers say they believe training is important, they typically consider the implementation and execution of L&D in their organization to be less than effective. In fact, HBR states that 75% of managers (registration required) are dissatisfied with their company's L&D function. Why the disconnect? Based on our experience developing learning strategies and cultures with companies, we've found six critical L&D problems that exist in many organizations today.

1. Some L&D teams lack L&D expertise and real-world credibility. We typically find that those responsible for the L&D efforts lack in-depth expertise in developing and/or delivering content. The L&D function is too often another step in an HR generalist's approach to getting their experience in all aspects of the business. Add to this the fact that most of these people designing and delivering content have little to no operations experience, and many have never actually led a team. As a result, we often see a situation where the L&D team will deliver the training they want to deliver, rather than what is actually needed in the operation or by the management team. Therefore, it is not surprising when there is a lack of confidence with in-house training teams.

2. The training offered is not what is needed. As mentioned, we see many L&D teams delivering training that doesn't directly relate to improving individual or organizational performance. They often focus on measuring success by the number of trainings provided, instead of focusing on the quality of what is delivered. We see a lot of training created that is generic and at a high enough level to "cover everybody." This approach is limiting, and it is no wonder that 70% of employees (registration required) report they do not have the mastery to do their jobs. L&D in the future must be more personalized and customized to what people really need — providing specific training to drive habit improvement.

3. L&D becomes a mandatory to-do. Once a lack of confidence in the value of training occurs, management teams become resistant to sending their people to training, and they often do not see the value in their own attendance. As a result, organizations, at the request of their L&D teams, will often shift to make training mandatory, thereby forcing individuals into learning. I can tell you from experience that forced training does not work, especially when the content and delivery is dull and lacks relevance.

4. The focus is on training events, not a learning culture. Some organizations seem more focused on investing and delivering training events, one-off training sessions that are not always connected, relevant nor delivered when they are needed most. It is no wonder that many managers loathe the training process. When the focus is just on "ticking the box" with a certain number of events rather than evolving an attitude throughout the organization on the benefits and need for learning, the training investment is often wasted. Companies must establish an attitude and infrastructure that offers employees and managers the time and opportunity for continuous learning on a variety of subjects in a variety of mediums at any time.

5. The top of the organization has stopped learning. Another issue limiting a learning culture is when L&D is not truly supported from the top of the organization. While every executive we meet says they support training, they often do not engage in any learning and development themselves. Whenever we see true learning cultures, it is usually because there is real participation and support from the very top of the organization. Not only do these executives stop leading when they stop learning, but they also send a message that training is not as important as they might be telling us.

6. The training overlooks the biological realities of learning and retention. Simply put, many training sessions we review are too long, try to cram too much information into a single session or are just boring. As attention spans become shorter, we must evolve the learning experience to be more interactive, built around games and/or discussions and involve participants being hands-on. We need to build training that fits our employees rather than trying to make our employees fit our training. We must also be more considerate of how retention works, meaning that training strategies must be built around opportunities with time to practice skills learned and less time on introducing new concepts. On-the-job-training is still the best learning experience, so more emphasis must be placed on allowing time to practice in the operation rather than on a computer or in a classroom.

Learning cultures are essential for the modern organization. In the 2020s, companies must move beyond just offering learning events or a curriculum of e-learning modules and focus on developing a true learning culture, one that inspires, open minds, supports change and growth, encourages creativity, delivers innovation and develops the next level of leaders. It is time to consider whether your business is maximizing its investment in training and if your company is approaching L&D correctly. Consider whether any of these issues apply to you, and be willing to rethink your L&D to maximize your ROI.

Mon, 10 Feb 2020 00:00:00 -0600 Shane Green en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2020/02/10/why-your-traditional-approach-to-learning-and-development-wont-cut-it-in-the-2020s/
81-YO God of Aesthetics Reveals the “The Power of Minimal Training” No result found, try new keyword!The former Mr. Olympia, Frank Zane is known for his unique training approach— a philosophy that challenges the idea that more is always better. The God of Aesthetics has recently unveiled a ... Tue, 19 Dec 2023 20:51:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Baltimore's new approach to police training looks at the effects of trauma, importance of empathy

A three-minute viral video shows an irate Baltimore police officer berating a teenager because he ignored orders to stop skateboarding and called the officer "dude."

"Obviously your parents don't put a foot in your butt quite enough because you don't understand the meaning of respect," he shouted at the skateboarder, who remained relatively calm.

That 2007 interaction cost the officer his job. But as policing evolves, others are learning from his mistakes.

The Baltimore Police Department recently started requiring its members to complete a program on emotional regulation that uses video as a learning tool and teaches them the basics of brain science by examining the relationship between thoughts, feelings and actions. It's a far cry from traditional police training.

In a city whose embattled police force has long struggled to earn public trust, especially since Freddie Gray's 2015 death from spinal injuries sustained in police custody, department leaders are demonstrating their willingness to think outside the box. The approach could become more common as agencies nationwide dedicate more resources to addressing mental health challenges among officers and preventing negative public interactions.

Baltimore's program is overseen by the anti-violence organization Roca, which works primarily with at-risk youth from the city's poorest and most violent neighborhoods — a population that has more in common with police officers than some might think, according to Roca staff. The organization has provided a curriculum for the eight-hour Rewire4 course, which is now required of all Baltimore police officers. Other law enforcement agencies along the East Coast have also adopted the program, including the Boston Police Department.

"In the streets, we look at some police officers like they're crazy, and they look at us like we're crazy," said James "JT" Timpson, a Baltimore resident who helps lead the Roca Impact Institute. "But we're both experiencing the same thing, which is trauma."

Understanding that common ground helps officers relate to members of the public, said Maj. Derek Loeffler, who oversees training and education for the Baltimore Police Department.

Officers in the course were asked to describe some of their most memorable calls for service. One officer recalled a case where three children were found decapitated, comparing the scene to something out of a horror movie. She said the images will haunt her forever.

"It takes a toll," instructor Lt. Lakishia Tucker told the class. "This stuff ain't normal that we see, that we deal with, that we handle on a daily basis."

Police officers are human underneath the uniform, she said, and experiencing repeated trauma can result in hypervigilant behavior.

Instructors played the 2007 viral video as an example of what happens when a person gets triggered and starts operating in survival mode, which they called "bottom brain" because it activates neurological pathways associated with fear and stress responses. The "top brain," however, is where reason prevails, leading to slower, more careful decision-making.

The training, which was observed by an Associated Press reporter, presented a series of practices rooted in cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of psychotherapy aimed at strengthening healthy neurological pathways in the brain through awareness and repetition. "Flex your thinking" and "Label your feelings" are among the skills presented. Participants can also sign up to receive key lesson reminders via text messages from Roca staff after the training.

The Rewire4 curriculum is a modified version of what the organization's outreach workers use in their interactions with at-risk youth. Roca, which was founded in Massachusetts over three decades ago, opened an office in Baltimore in 2018. It has since provided hundreds of young men with life-coaching services, job opportunities and behavioral health tools aimed at preventing the rapidly escalating conflicts that so often turn deadly.

Exposing police to similar tools could help reduce police violence, avoid unfavorable headlines and build community trust, organizers said.

"Today is an invitation for you to learn something that can help you personally and professionally," Tucker told the class of officers. "Law enforcement is different today. Every single thing is being recorded."

The increased prevalence of body cameras and cellphones means officers are facing more pressure to stay calm even when they get triggered.

During the class, instructors talked about how to avoid a "bottom brain" reaction, in part by approaching others with empathy.

"We have to learn how to separate the person from the behavior," Tucker said.

That could mean dismantling stereotypes, such as assuming everyone in a certain neighborhood is a drug dealer, said Sgt. Amy Strand, another instructor.

"I like to twist it and say, what about us?" she said, describing how some people assume all police officers are corrupt and aggressive. "We get it dealt to us, so let's not deal it out to everybody else. Give some grace."

The Baltimore Police Department recently started administering the training amid a slew of other reform efforts dating back years. In the wake of Gray's death, Justice Department investigators uncovered a pattern of unconstitutional policing practices, especially against Black residents. That led to a 2017 federal consent decree mandating a series of court-ordered changes.

Soon thereafter, several officers were indicted on federal racketeering charges as the Gun Trace Task Force corruption scandal reverberated through the department, further fracturing public trust. In recent months, the department received criticism after two police shootings in adjacent neighborhoods.

Sgt. Maria Velez, the third instructor, said the career brings its challenges, but she still wants to help people. She asked her colleagues to think about their reasons for joining the police force.

"This is more than just a job. You have a calling for this, something inside of you that makes you want to get up every single day and push through adversity," she said. "Everyone here is still choosing to show up, regardless of what's happened."

Tue, 26 Dec 2023 01:52:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/baltimore/news/baltimores-new-approach-to-police-training-looks-at-the-effects-of-trauma-importance-of-empathy/
All the AI terms you need to know No result found, try new keyword!Generative pre-trained transformer (GPT): A particular kind of LLM design, introduced by OpenAI, that uses a hybrid training approach, with an initial "pre-training" that is unsupervised and then ... Wed, 22 Nov 2023 22:03:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ The PACT Institute
'Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy

Year Founded: 2003

Model of Therapy: Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy

The Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy® is a cohesive approach derived from research in three areas: developmental neuroscience, attachment theory, and arousal regulation. Neuroscience provides a physiological basis from which to understand individuals’ behavior within a relationship. Attachment theory explains the biological need to bond with others. Experiences in early relationships create a blueprint that informs the sense of safety and security adult partners bring to relationships. Understanding the biology of human arousal allows therapists to facilitate partners’ immediate and continuous ability to manage energy, alertness, and readiness to engage. PACT has a reputation for effectively treating the most challenging couples.

The PACT Institute offers a training program that extends over three years and includes three progressive levels. Level I is a beginner course taught by the PACT core faculty. Level II is an advanced course and Level III is a practicum course, and these levels are taught by Dr. Tatkin. These courses are offered at various locations in the United States and some levels are also available internationally.

Three Level I sessions and two Level II sessions take place over the course of three days and feature a combination of instructional methods. These methods include didactic instruction, multimedia presentations, group discussions, experiential exercises, clinical video presentations, case consultations, and live case enactments. Trainings enhance knowledge about all aspects of PACT, including assessment of and interventions for attachment, arousal regulation, and neurological capacity. Included with the courses are a manual, online forums, downloadable articles, webinars, and online quizzes.

The Level III course is a certification course exclusively offered to students who have completed Level II. In this final course, students will attend two 3-day sessions with Dr. Tatkin in addition to performing ongoing PACT work with patients in their own clinical practice. Upon successful completion of Level III, students will have the opportunity to take the certification assessment.

About the Founder(s)

  • 'Stan Tatkin

    Stan Tatkin

    Stan Tatkin, PsyD, MFT, clinician and developer of A Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy®, teaches at UCLA and maintains a private practice in Southern California. He developed the PACT Institute to train psychotherapists nationwide and internationally to use PACT in their clinical practice. Stan is the author of the bestselling book Wired for Love: How Understanding Neurobiology and Attachment Style Can Help You Find Your Ideal Mate, among other publications. 

  • 'Tracey Boldemann-Tatkin

    Tracey Boldemann-Tatkin

    Tracey Boldemann-Tatkin, PhD is the co-founder of the PACT institute and brings to her work years of experience in aiding human welfare. Tracy has directed various philanthropic family foundations over the course of three decades and has been involved at the ground level of humanitarian efforts worldwide.

  • Founder / Lead Developer: Stan Tatkin
  • Executive Director: Stan Tatkin and Tracey Boldemann-Tatkin
  • Address: 5012 Chesebro Road Suite 201, Agoura Hills, CA, 91301
  • Phone: (323) 510-8960
  • Website: thepactinstitute.com

Contact The PACT Institute

Your message has been sent successfully.

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 06:14:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.goodtherapy.org/training-courses/the-pact-institute.html
IIA Qatar conducts training on emerging enterprise risks

Participants during the ‘Emerging Enterprise Risks with Evolving and Effective Control’ webinar, recently.

Doha, Qatar: The Institute of Internal Auditors Qatar Chapter conducted training on ‘Emerging Enterprise Risks with Evolving and Effective Control’ by Tejjashree Rao, Chief Internal Auditor of British American Tobacco, UK, Middle East and Africa Regional Operations and Global Technology. The session focused on three areas: Emerging Risks Landscape, Controls and effective management of emerging risks.

Tejjashree mentioned the Emerging risks landscape as “The perfect storm of high-impact interlocking risks faced by organizations.” Top risks were listed as macroeconomic and geopolitical uncertainty, Digital Transformation, Cyber and data security, Human capital and talent management, and ESG.

“The emerging risks to move from reactive (measure & manage) to proactive (sense and respond) risk management. Predictive risk identification requires techniques like Horizon Scanning and Key Risk Indicators (KRI), Continuous monitoring, and Data analytics for audit risk assessments. Dynamic Risk Prioritization involves using risk velocity to gauge which emerging risks need immediate attention and warrant an audit. Adaptive Risk Response uses Agile Audit Principles to refine the design of controls as the risk evolves,” Tejjashree explained.

Macroeconomic and geopolitical uncertainty risk-related controls that should be in place are scenario planning, liquidity management, financial modeling, and operational resilience. The consideration for audit is continuous monitoring with stakeholders.

Digital transformation risk requires control by aligning project benefits to the organization’s strategic goals and a robust program Governance, Oversight, and Status Reporting. “Internal audit should add more ‘Advisory reviews’ on the plan for key projects to provide real-time inputs as the project progresses through its lifecycle,” stated Shree as a solution.

Cyber and Data Security risk mitigation controls consist of Cyber Incident Response and Recovery Plans, Identity and Access Management Policies and Standards, and Cyber threat intelligence and monitoring procedures. Internal audits should consider Automated Continuous Control Monitoring reports to provide a more real-time view of vulnerable areas.

Human capital and talent management risk cannot be taken lightly by auditors. Conducting thematic culture audits covering identified hotspots and additional audit ratings for management risk awareness and control culture is recommended. “During all audits, evaluate how the Function/business area is mitigating People risks,” Shree enforced.

The main aspects of ESG risks and controls are to monitor progress made against ESG goals and regulatory requirements from international laws on ESG. Focus is to be given to ESG Data Management, especially on those metrics that are externally reported.

“The training imparted invaluable insights into emerging risks, effective internal control, and internal audit preparedness. Shree emphasized auditors deliver value through planned assurance and continuous controls monitoring, insights & foresight through increased automation & data analytics, and an improved organizational risk & control culture. The perspectives provided were compelling, relatable, and adaptable,” Sundaresan Rajeswar, Board Member, said in his concluding remarks.

Girish Jain, seminar chair, conducted the Question and Answers session and opened the meeting. Robert Abboud, Past President of the IIA, spoke during the closing session.

Sun, 17 Dec 2023 21:41:00 -0600 en text/html https://thepeninsulaqatar.com/article/18/12/2023/iia-qatar-conducts-training-on-emerging-enterprise-risks
Harris on his approach to training camp

Special teams coordinator Dave Fipp talks at the podium to break down the game against Dallas from a special teams perspective. He talks about the fake punt thrown by linebacker Jalen Reeves-Maybin and how he thought that impacted the game, talks about Minnesota and some similarities between them and Dallas on that side of the ball and, also talks about Reeves-Maybin being selected for this years Pro Bowl.

Sat, 29 Jul 2023 03:51:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.detroitlions.com/video/harris-on-his-approach-to-training-camp
Baltimore's new approach to police training looks at the effects of trauma, importance of empathy

BALTIMORE (AP) — A three-minute viral video shows an irate Baltimore police officer berating a teenager because he ignored orders to stop skateboarding and called the officer “dude.”

“Obviously your parents don’t put a foot in your butt quite enough because you don’t understand the meaning of respect,” he shouted at the skateboarder, who remained relatively calm.

That 2007 interaction cost the officer his job. But as policing evolves, others are learning from his mistakes.

The Baltimore Police Department recently started requiring its members to complete a program on emotional regulation that uses video as a learning tool and teaches them the basics of brain science by examining the relationship between thoughts, feelings and actions. It’s a far cry from traditional police training.

In a city whose embattled police force has long struggled to earn public trust, especially since Freddie Gray’s 2015 death from spinal injuries sustained in police custody, department leaders are demonstrating their willingness to think outside the box. The approach could become more common as agencies nationwide dedicate more resources to addressing mental health challenges among officers and preventing negative public interactions.

Baltimore’s program is overseen by the anti-violence organization Roca, which works primarily with at-risk youth from the city’s poorest and most violent neighborhoods — a population that has more in common with police officers than some might think, according to Roca staff. The organization has provided a curriculum for the eight-hour Rewire4 course, which is now required of all Baltimore police officers. Other law enforcement agencies along the East Coast have also adopted the program, including the Boston Police Department.

“In the streets, we look at some police officers like they’re crazy, and they look at us like we’re crazy,” said James “JT” Timpson, a Baltimore resident who helps lead the Roca Impact Institute. “But we’re both experiencing the same thing, which is trauma.”

Understanding that common ground helps officers relate to members of the public, said Maj. Derek Loeffler, who oversees training and education for the Baltimore Police Department.

Officers in the course were asked to describe some of their most memorable calls for service. One officer recalled a case where three children were found decapitated, comparing the scene to something out of a horror movie. She said the images will haunt her forever.

“It takes a toll,” instructor Lt. Lakishia Tucker told the class. “This stuff ain’t normal that we see, that we deal with, that we handle on a daily basis.”

Police officers are human underneath the uniform, she said, and experiencing repeated trauma can result in hypervigilant behavior.

Instructors played the 2007 viral video as an example of what happens when a person gets triggered and starts operating in survival mode, which they called “bottom brain” because it activates neurological pathways associated with fear and stress responses. The “top brain,” however, is where reason prevails, leading to slower, more careful decision-making.

The training, which was observed by an Associated Press reporter, presented a series of practices rooted in cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of psychotherapy aimed at strengthening healthy neurological pathways in the brain through awareness and repetition. “Flex your thinking” and “Label your feelings” are among the skills presented. Participants can also sign up to receive key lesson reminders via text messages from Roca staff after the training.

The Rewire4 curriculum is a modified version of what the organization’s outreach workers use in their interactions with at-risk youth. Roca, which was founded in Massachusetts over three decades ago, opened an office in Baltimore in 2018. It has since provided hundreds of young men with life-coaching services, job opportunities and behavioral health tools aimed at preventing the rapidly escalating conflicts that so often turn deadly.

Exposing police to similar tools could help reduce police violence, avoid unfavorable headlines and build community trust, organizers said.

“Today is an invitation for you to learn something that can help you personally and professionally,” Tucker told the class of officers. “Law enforcement is different today. Every single thing is being recorded.”

The increased prevalence of body cameras and cellphones means officers are facing more pressure to stay calm even when they get triggered.

During the class, instructors talked about how to avoid a “bottom brain” reaction, in part by approaching others with empathy.

“We have to learn how to separate the person from the behavior,” Tucker said.

That could mean dismantling stereotypes, such as assuming everyone in a certain neighborhood is a drug dealer, said Sgt. Amy Strand, another instructor.

“I like to twist it and say, what about us?” she said, describing how some people assume all police officers are corrupt and aggressive. “We get it dealt to us, so let’s not deal it out to everybody else. Give some grace.”

The Baltimore Police Department recently started administering the training amid a slew of other reform efforts dating back years. In the wake of Gray’s death, Justice Department investigators uncovered a pattern of unconstitutional policing practices, especially against Black residents. That led to a 2017 federal consent decree mandating a series of court-ordered changes.

Soon thereafter, several officers were indicted on federal racketeering charges as the Gun Trace Task Force corruption scandal reverberated through the department, further fracturing public trust. In recent months, the department received criticism after two police shootings in adjacent neighborhoods.

Sgt. Maria Velez, the third instructor, said the career brings its challenges, but she still wants to help people. She asked her colleagues to think about their reasons for joining the police force.

“This is more than just a job. You have a calling for this, something inside of you that makes you want to get up every single day and push through adversity,” she said. “Everyone here is still choosing to show up, regardless of what’s happened.”

Mon, 25 Dec 2023 19:36:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/baltimores-approach-police-training-looks-143631253.html
Williams on his approach to training camp

Special teams coordinator Dave Fipp talks at the podium to break down the game against Dallas from a special teams perspective. He talks about the fake punt thrown by linebacker Jalen Reeves-Maybin and how he thought that impacted the game, talks about Minnesota and some similarities between them and Dallas on that side of the ball and, also talks about Reeves-Maybin being selected for this years Pro Bowl.

Mon, 31 Jul 2023 06:16:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.detroitlions.com/video/williams-on-his-approach-to-training-camp




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