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GMAT-Quntitative GMAT Quantitative exam

Test Detail:
The GMAT Quantitative section, also known as GMAT-Quantitative or GMAT Math, is a component of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) administered by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). This section measures your mathematical and analytical skills to solve quantitative problems. The following description provides an overview of the GMAT Quantitative exam.

Course Outline:
To prepare for the GMAT Quantitative section, you can consider a comprehensive course that covers the following key areas:

1. Arithmetic:
- Fractions, decimals, and percentages
- Ratios and proportions
- Exponents and roots
- Descriptive statistics (mean, median, mode, etc.)

2. Algebra:
- Solving equations and inequalities
- Quadratic equations
- Algebraic expressions and manipulations
- Functions and graphing

3. Geometry:
- Lines, angles, and triangles
- Circles and polygons
- Perimeter, area, and volume
- Coordinate geometry

4. Word Problems:
- Problem-solving strategies
- Work, rate, and distance problems
- Mixtures, ratios, and proportions
- Probability and statistics

Exam Objectives:
The GMAT Quantitative section aims to assess your ability to apply mathematical concepts and reasoning to solve quantitative problems. The exam objectives include the following:

1. Problem Solving (approximately 67% - 75%):
- Analyzing and solving quantitative problems
- Applying mathematical concepts and formulas to various scenarios
- Interpreting and analyzing data presented in tables, charts, and graphs

2. Data Sufficiency (approximately 25% - 33%):
- Evaluating information given in two statements to determine sufficiency
- Assessing the relevance and completeness of information provided
- Identifying the minimum amount of information needed to solve a problem

Exam Syllabus:
The GMAT Quantitative section covers a range of topics within the exam objectives mentioned above. The syllabus may include the following:

- Arithmetic: Fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios, and proportions
- Algebra: Equations, inequalities, exponents, roots, functions, and sequences
- Geometry: Lines, angles, triangles, circles, polygons, and coordinate geometry
- Word Problems: Applications of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry in real-world scenarios
- Data Sufficiency: Assessing the sufficiency of given information to solve problems
GMAT Quantitative exam
GMAT Quantitative study

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GMAT-Quntitative GMAT Quantitative exam

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Question: 703
What percent is A of B?
(1) B is 32 more than the square root of A.
(2) A is more than 12 less than B/2.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
In this question you have two unknowns, A and B, and thus you need two equations.
Statement (1) is not enough to find A and B.
Statement (2) can be written as: A > B/2 "" 12.
The second statement is an inequality and not an equation and another equation is needed to solve the question.
Question: 704
The perimeter of a rectangle is 136, what is the area of the rectangle?
(1) The length is more than twice the width.
(2) The length and width are both prime numbers larger than 30.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: B
Define L as the length and W as the width.
2L + 2W = 136 ---> L + W = 68. We need one more equation in order to find the area.
Statement (1) does not give you exact values and therefore it's not sufficient.
Statement (2) tells us that both L and W are prime numbers larger than 30, using the equation in the question; the
only option to get 68 is with 31 and 37. This statement is sufficient; the area is 31 x 37.
Question: 705
On an IQ exam, each correct answer grants the examinee with 3 points but every wrong answer deducts 1 points.
How much did Ernst get on the IQ exam?
- There are 50 questions in the IQ exam
- The ratio between the rights answers and the wrong answers that Ernst answered is 9 to 1.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: C
Define C as the number of correct answers and W as the number of wrong answers.
Statement (1) tells us that C + W = 50.
Statement (2) tells us that (50 / (9+1) = 5) is the number of wrong answers and so 45 is the number of right ones.
Using the numbers presented in the question we can answer the question of how much Ernst got. Thus, Statement
(1) and (2) combined are sufficient.
Question: 706
Is A a multiple of B?
- B is a multiple of A.
- 2A is a multiple of B.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
Rephrase the Question: is A/B an integer?
Statement (1) can be written as: B/A is an integer. Take A = 5, b = 10: B/A is an integer but A/B isn't.
Take A=B=4, A/B = B/A and they are both integers and therefore this statement is insufficient.
Statement (2) can be written as 2A/B is an integer. Take A=10, B=20: 2A/B is an integer but A/B isn't.
Take A=B=1: 2A/B is an integer and also A/B is an integer and therefore this statement is also insufficient.
Question: 707
If A and B are two different two-digit numbers, is (A + B)/2 an integer?
- AB is an odd number.
- (B-A) is an even number.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: D
We are required to find if the sum of A and B is an even number.
Statement (1) tells us that AB is odd. The multiplications of two odd numbers only will give an odd number and so
A and B are both odd numbers and therefore their sum is an even number. This statement is sufficient by itself.
Statement (2) is also sufficient, if the difference between two numbers is even then the numbers can either be both
odds or both even. In any of the cases, their sum is even.
Question: 708
If X and Y are both two-digit numbers, is XY an even number?
- The sum of X and Y gives an even number.
- The value of Y is three times the value of X.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
Statement (1) isn't sufficient, X and Y can be both odd or both even, but their multiplication can be either one.
Statement (2) tells us that Y = 3X, X and Y can both be even or odd from this statement and therefore this
statement is also insufficient.
Both of the statements imply the same thing and so combining them will not help. More data is required.
Question: 709
Arthur and Bartholomew live in the same multi-story apartment building. How many stories does the building
have?
- There are 5 stories between the apartment of Arthur and Bartholomew.
- There are 8 stories above Arthur's apartment and 8 stories below Bartholomew's apartment.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
Define A as the Arthur's floor and B as Bartholomew's floor.
Using both statements, we don't know whether A is over B or the opposite and therefore we cannot determine the
number of stories in the building.
If A is above B then: The number of stories is (5+8+8 = 21).
If B is above A then: The number of stories is (5+3+3 = 11).
Question: 710
Comp and Calc are two companies that are located on different floors in a skyscraper. How many floors does the
skyscraper have?
- There are 24 floors between Comp's floor and Calc's floor.
- There are 32 floors above Comp's floor and 12 floors bellow Calc's floor.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: C
Using both statements we know that Comp's floor is the higher one among the two because there are only 12 floors
beneath Calc's floor and therefore it must be the lower one.
The number of floors in the building is (12 + 24 + 32 = 68).
The combination of the two statements is sufficient.
Question: 711
What is the distance between Greentown to Blue town?
- The distance between Greentown to Red town is 20 miles.
- The distance between Blue to Red town is 5 miles.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
Draw a guiding chart with three points on it.
Statement (1) tells us nothing about Blue town and so it's insufficient.
Statement (2) tells us nothing about Greentown and so it's insufficient on its own.
Even after you combine both statements, you don't know if Red town is between both cities or not.
The distance from Greentown to Blue town can be 25 or 15 miles. More data is required.
Question: 712
How long does it take to drive from the factory to the warehouse?
- It takes 15 minutes to drive from the factory to the harbor.
- It takes 25 minutes to drive from the warehouse to the harbor.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
From both statements we can't conclude where the location of the harbor relative to the other two places is, in other
words, the harbor could be between the factory and the warehouse or it could be beyond the two.
The distance between the factory and the warehouse can be between 10 and 40 miles.
Question: 713
Jasmine is the oldest member of the "Brain Storm club". If next year, the age of Sam will be two thirds that of
Jasmine, what is Sam's age today?
- Rick and Sam's twin brother.
- Three years ago, Rick's age was half of that of Jasmine.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: C
Define J as the age of Jasmine and S as the age of Sam.
The question tells us that in a year from now: (S + 1) = 2/3 x (Y + 1).
Statement (1) presents a new parameter, Rick's age, which is equal to Sam's age.
Statement (2) tells us that: (X "" 3) = ½ x (Y "" 3).
Using both statements, we have two equations with two unknowns.
Question: 714
X is a prime number. Is Y odd?
(1) X is divisible by 7.
(2) YX is an even number.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: C
From statement one we conclude that X=7 because it's the only prime number that can be divided by 7. From
statement two we conclude that if X was a odd number Y must be an even number, therefore both statements are
required in order to solve the question.
Question: 715
Ruth's age is two-thirds of Chris's age. How old is Chris?
(1) Two years ago Ruth was half the age Chris is today.
(2) Four and a half years from now Ruth will be seven eights of Chris's age.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: D
From the question we know that R (Ruth) = (Chris). That's one equation with two variables; we need one more
equation to solve the problem. Both statements are suitable equations and thus the answer is (d).
Question: 716
Bob is older than his brother, Jimmy. How old is Jimmy?
(1) Two years ago Jimmy was one-third of bob's age today.
(2) In six years from today Bob will be three times Jimmy's age today.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: E
Build an equation from each statement both equations are identical. Since we need two different equations to find
two unknowns, we cannot solve this question.
Question: 717
If X is divisible by 4, is Y odd?
(1) Y = x + 3.
(2) X = 4.
A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though
NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, requiring more
data pertaining to the problem.
Answer: A
From the question one can conclude that x is even. From statement one: an even number + odd number is an odd
number. Thus, y must be odd. Statement two doesn't mention y at all, and is therefore insufficient
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Test Information

Study Materials

  • Math Review for Standardized Tests by Cliffs Notes. You can purchase the book on Amazon.
  • If you register on mba.com, you have access to their Free GMATPrep Test-Preparation Software, which includes a 15-question practice section for each type of GMAT question, with answers and explanations for each question and computing of Verbal and Quantitative scores, which you can use to judge how prepared you are for the actual GMAT exam.
  • GMAT Free: Practice with 800 sample questions and 600 videos, accessible on your laptop, tablet, or phone, brought to you by the "guru of the GMAT."
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Full-Length Practice Tests

  • Princeton Review also provides full-length practice tests for both the GMAT and GRE, which can be helpful getting used to the computer tests:
  • GRE Prep Courses/Test Preparation and free practice GRE test published by KapTest.

GMAT Practice Quiz

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Exam Information

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Exam Preparation

About the GMAT

The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) was designed to help business schools assess the qualifications of applicants for advanced study in business and management. It measures basic verbal, quantitative, and writing skills that are developed over a long period of time and is available year-round at test centers throughout the world. Of the several thousand graduate management programs worldwide, 1,700 use the GMAT and more than 1,000 require it.

In the school selection process, applicants are asked to show evidence of their potential to succeed. The GMAT is only one such measure of potential academic performance in graduate management education. In addition to the GMAT, this evidence typically includes academic records, work experience, application essays, recommendations, and interviews.

The GMAT is specifically designed to measure the verbal, quantitative, and writing skills of applicants for graduate study in business. It does not, however, presuppose any specific knowledge of business or other specific content areas, nor does it measure achievement in any particular subject areas. In addition, the test does not measure subjective factors important to academic and career success-such as motivation, creativity, interpersonal skills, and study skills. Test takers should note that the GMAT is entirely in English and that all instructions are provided in English.

All of the information that you need to prepare yourself for taking GMAT including the actual directions on the test, sample questions, and testing procedures are contained in subsequent sections of this website, and are repeated in the GMAT Information Bulletin.

Format and Content

The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) is a standardized assessment. Each individual test that is administered contains the same format and areas of content. The test is comprised of three main sections-analytical writing, quantitative reasoning, and verbal reasoning. Each of these areas is measured using different types of questions that have specific instructions for each. Visit Overview for more specific information about each section.

It is important to recognize that the GMAT evaluates skills and abilities that develop over relatively long periods of time. Although the sections are basically verbal or mathematical, the complete test provides one method of measuring overall ability. The GMAT does not test specific knowledge obtained in college course work, and it does not seek to measure achievements in any specific areas of study.

The Graduate Management Admission Council® recognizes that questions arise concerning techniques for taking standardized examinations such as the GMAT, and it is hoped that the descriptions and sample questions provided on the website will give you practical familiarity with both the concepts and techniques required by GMAT questions. Of course, specific questions vary from one GMAT to another. Test questions are continuously written to replace previously administered questions, but must meet content and statistical requirements for the GMAT. Actual test questions that have been used previously are published in the Sample GMAT® Questions and GMAT Mini-Test areas and in The Official Guide for GMAT® Review and the GMAT: POWERPREP® 3.0 Software.

Part of the standardization of the GMAT relates to the procedures followed at the testing center on the test day. Please visit the Procedures & Regulations area of the website to review these procedures before you appear at the test center. This will help reduce your anxiety and avoid any unforeseen problems the day of your test.

Format

The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) includes analytical writing, quantitative, and verbal questions using a computer-adaptive format-the test adjusts to your individual ability level. Questions are chosen from a very large pool of test questions categorized by content and difficulty. Only one question at a time is presented to you on the screen. The first question is always of middle difficulty. The selection of each question thereafter is determined by your responses to all previous questions. In other words, the adaptive test adjusts to your ability level—you will get few questions that are too easy or too difficult for you.

You must answer each question and may not return to or change your answer to any previous question. If you answer a question incorrectly by mistake-or correctly by lucky guess-you answer to subsequent questions will lead you back to questions that are at the appropriate level of difficulty for you.

Every test contains trial multiple-choice questions needed for pre-testing for future use. These questions, however, are not identified and appear in varying locations within the test. You should therefore do your best on all questions. Answers to trial questions are not counted in the scoring of your test.

Content

The GMAT consists of four separately timed sections (see Summary). Each of the first two sections contains a 30-minute writing task; the other two sections are 75 minutes each and contain multiple-choice questions;

  1. Analytical Writing Assessment

    You begin the GMAT with the Analytical Writing Assessment, which is comprised of two essays topics selected by the computer. You are allowed 30 minutes to respond to each topic. One task is to analyze an issue; the other is to analyze an argument. Most topics are published on the website (see Sample GMAT® Questions) and in the GMAT®: POWERPREP® 3.0 Software. The Analytical Writing Assessment measures the ability to think critically and communicate complex ideas through writing.

  2. Quantitative Section

    After an optional five-minute break, you begin the GMAT Quantitative section. This section contains 37 multiple-choice questions (with five answer choices per question) of either two question types, Data Sufficiency or Problem Solving. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the section. The Quantitative section measures basic mathematical skills and understanding of elementary concepts, and the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data.

  3. Verbal Section

    After a second optional five-minute break, you begin the GMAT Verbal section. This section contains 41 multiple-choice questions (with five answer choices per question) of any of three question types, Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the section. The Verbal section measures the ability to understand and evaluate what is read and to recognize basic conventions of standard written English.

  4. Completing the Testing Session

    Following the end of the official testing time, you are asked questions concerning your background and the schools to which you are sending your GMAT scores. You may print a copy of your GMAT Quantitative, Verbal, and Total scores at the center at the end of your testing session.

Summary of Format, Content, and Scoring

You'll receive four GMAT scores:

Analytical Writing Assessment
Score ranges from 0–6. This is a separate score that is less important than the 200–800 cumulative score.

  • Analysis of an Issue (1 Topic, 30 Minutes)
  • Analysis of an Argument (1 Topic, 30 Minutes)
  • Optional Rest Break (5 Minutes)

GMAT Quantitative
Quantitative scaled sub-score, ranging from 0–60. (Effectively, 51 is the max score.)

  • Problem Solving (37 Questions, 75 Minutes)
  • Data Sufficiency
  • Optional Rest Break (5 Minutes)

GMAT Verbal
Verbal scaled sub-score, ranging from 0–60. (Effectively, 48 is the max score.)

  • Reading Comprehension (41 Questions, 75 Minutes)
  • Critical Reasoning
  • Sentence Correction

Overall
Scaled score, ranging from 200–800. This is an overall score that is the combination of your 0–60 Quantitative and Verbal scores. The 200–800 cumulative score is what business schools primarily use.

National Averages
50th Percentile: 540
75th Percentile: 620
90th Percentile: 690
95th Percentile: 720
99th Percentile: 760–800

Retaking GMAT Tests

You may take the test (computer-based and/or paper-based) only once per calendar month and no more than 5 times in any 12-month period. This applies even if you canceled your scores on a test taken previously.

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Key takeaways

  • Applying for an MBA program can be a long and difficult process.

  • Focus your energy on optimizing the key application components to create a standout application.

  • Know your application deadlines and plan in advance to complete each part of your MBA application on time.

Getting into a Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is certainly a challenge. The average acceptance rate for the top MBA programs in 2022 was 22.2 percent. But the odds are getting better over time. This acceptance rate used to be under one in five.

Even with improved odds, getting into an MBA program can seem daunting. However, with the right preparation, persistence and a little guidance from an expert, you can increase your likelihood of getting accepted.

What you’ll need to get into an MBA program

Each school has its own application process, and you’ll need different information for each one. However, there are a few common requirements for your MBA application.

Stand-out standardized test scores

MBA applications require test scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) to compare applicant ability.

The GMAT evaluates an applicant’s quantitative, analytical, writing, reading and verbal skills. Students should take this test several months before the application deadline to give themselves enough time to retake it if needed.

Applicants can prepare for the test through in-person or online prep courses. You can find a lot of free or low-cost resources online. The makers of the GMAT have provided several of their own resources to help test-takers prepare, including a mini quiz and a free eight-week study planner.

Business schools often accept scores in the 650 to 690 range but prefer 700 or higher.

While the GMAT is often the first choice for MBA students and schools, you can also consider the GRE. This standardized test measures academic readiness for graduate programs of many types. More than 1,000 business schools accept GRE scores.

The costs for the two different tests vary. You can take the GMAT at a test center for $275 or online for $300. Taking the GRE costs $220.

A strong undergraduate transcript

Undergraduate transcripts showcase the applicants’ academic ability. MBA admissions officers look at your cumulative GPA but also consider factors like the undergraduate institution’s academic reputation and the types of courses you’ve taken.

These factors help admissions officers compare and rank students by their GPAs.

Many top business schools do not set a minimum requirement for undergraduate GPAs, but you’ll have the best chance of being accepted to top MBA programs with a GPA above 3.5.

A tailored resume

Your resume should focus on grabbing the attention of the MBA admissions counselor. A traditional resume highlights your job skills and experiences. With an MBA resume, you want to highlight your accomplishments and help the reader understand why they matter.

“I always ask this question: ‘So what?’ after reading each bullet on a resume,” says Barbara Coward, founder and principal of MBA 360° Admissions Consulting. “Make the reader care. Show the significance of your work. Also, establish an emotional connection with the reader. Tie all of your experiences and education together through a single narrative.”

The resume should tell the story of why you are a good fit for the program. To craft a stellar resume, familiarize yourself with the MBA program and what they look for in candidates. Highlight experiences and skills that show you fit the mold.

Well-written essays

Many business schools require between one and three personal essays from applicants.

MBA admissions officers use personal essays to get to know the candidates. A well-written essay may be the deciding factor among applicants with similar academic backgrounds. Admissions officers look for clear, concise and persuasive essays with no grammatical errors.

Students should expect essay prompts like:

  • How will this MBA program help you meet your career goals?

  • What will you contribute to the business school/MBA program?

  • What makes you a good candidate for this MBA program?

There are a few keys to writing a good essay for your MBA application. One of the common mistakes applicants make is not answering the question, according to Coward Ensure that your essay actually addresses the prompt. She also advises that you focus on clarity over complexity.

“Make it easy for the reader to understand what you are saying,” says Coward. “Simple sentences and concise messaging make it easy for a reader to get to know you better. You’re not trying to impress. Your job is to educate the reader so they can make an informed decision.”

Letters of recommendation

MBA programs typically require one to three letters of recommendation from people who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as an employer or college coach. Students should avoid asking for letters from family members or friends.

Letters of recommendation must emphasize professional accomplishments and desirable qualities and should explain why the applicant would be a good candidate for the program.

Interview skills

Many MBA programs require applicants to interview. This can be a sign that you’ve moved on to the next stage in the admissions process. You may interview with an admissions officer or an program alumnus alumnus. In all scenarios, the MBA interview is a chance to stand out and fill in any gaps in your application.

Preparing effectively for the interview can give you a leg up on other applicants. Here are a few things to remember as you prepare:

  • Practice (but not too much). Research common interview questions and rehearse your answers. You may want to practice adding more details than you normally would if you don’t like to talk about yourself. However, don’t practice so much that it feels like you are reciting a script. Instead, memorize your main talking points for each answer and vary your delivery.

  • Review your application materials. Look over your resume, personal essays and other application materials before the interview. The interviewer may ask you questions about what you wrote, so you’ll want to have a fresh memory. Make sure your written application and interview answers are consistent.

  • Be yourself. You’re looking for a program that wants you, so let your personality and interests shine. Talk about how you want to use your MBA. Discuss your passions and interests and don’t try to be a different person. Showing your personality can help your application be unique.

What MBA admissions officers want to see

While you want to show your personality, it’s important to understand what MBA admissions officers are looking for. You don’t want to be fake, but you also want to show desirable qualities.

Emotional intelligence, ability to work with others, empathy, curiosity and kindness are some of the key traits that MBA admissions officers search for in MBA candidates, according to Coward.

“I say that the admissions process is like the TSA at the airport. You don’t want that alarm to go off when you walk through security,” she adds. “Show that you will be a positive contributor to the cohort and that you are a nice person, not a jerk.”

Look at your own experiences and resume and think about how you can highlight examples of these traits in your own life. You can also show that you have these key traits through your interview process.

When to start prepping

Many business schools have several rounds of deadlines for admissions throughout the year. Students typically apply during the fall, winter or spring and receive an admissions decision within two to three months.

You’ll want to give yourself plenty of time to prepare each of the components of your MBA application. Think about how long each part of the application may take you and build a timeline accordingly. You’ll also need to consider when you can take the GMAT or GRE in order to get the scores by the application deadline. As you prepare, try to give yourself extra time so you don’t feel overly stressed.

If you find yourself on a tight turnaround to complete an application, remain calm. It’s best to focus your energy on the components you find most difficult first. You can get those out of the way and complete the easier application components closer to the deadline.

The bottom line

Getting accepted into an MBA program is a competitive process, particularly at the most prestigious schools. As you embark on this effort, be sure to do your research. Track application deadlines and lay the groundwork for a compelling application. Plan on gaining relevant work experience, building relationships with potential references and preparing for the GMAT or GRE.

Once your application is locked in, explore MBA loans and other funding options to ensure you can cover the cost of attendance.

Mon, 25 Dec 2023 23:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/finance/mba-program-top-tips-110055891.html
Quantitative vs Qualitative Business Research No result found, try new keyword!Quantitative business research focuses on quantifying behaviours, opinions, trends, and other variables by collecting and analysing measurable, numerical data. It answers questions related to “how ... Sun, 24 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 text/plain https://realbusiness.co.uk/quantitative-vs-qualitative Study Abroad: All About The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) No result found, try new keyword!The four sections in the test are: Analytical writing Verbal reasoning Quantitative reasoning Integrated reasoning The scores achieved in GMAT are generally valid for five years following ... Sun, 19 Nov 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Quantitative Data Interpretation

Quantitative data is information that has been procured through telephone or mail surveys, where the sample size is relatively large. Quantitative data is more reliable in predicting future consumer buying behavior than small sample qualitative data from, for example, focus groups. Quantitative data interpretation is the process of analyzing results from surveys, where information is often compiled into data tables for easy reference. Marketing research professionals interpret quantitative research data in various ways.

Identification

  1. Quantitative data interpretation includes studying the results from various questions in a survey. The results are usually displayed numerically and by percentage in the data tables. For example, a small company may conduct a customer satisfaction survey by phone. One question may state: "How satisfied are you overall with the product you purchased?" Possible responses to the question may be "very satisfied," "somewhat satisfied," "neither," "somewhat dissatisfied" and "very dissatisfied." A marketing research manager is particularly interested in the number of people who are "very" or "somewhat" satisfied with the product. For example, assume 300 customers answered the question and 250 or 83 percent were very or somewhat satisfied with the product. The company would likely interpret these data positively in that consumers are mostly satisfied with the product.

Significance

  1. Most marketing research professionals look for significant differences in data when making their interpretations. These differences are primarily relevant when comparing survey results from different periods. For example, consumers may be asked to rate a small company's customer service department on professionalism, accuracy, timeliness and whether the problem was actually solved. Improvements may have been made in all of these areas, but the timeliness results may have been the only significant improvement. Therefore, the interpretation would be that timeliness was the only major customer service improvement. All other results would suggest only anecdotal improvements.

Function

  1. Quantitative data interpretation is only part of the overall analysis for a survey. The research manager must also think of ways the information can be used to the company's advantage. Companies conduct marketing research to identify a problem or discover the needs and preferences of consumers. The data is meaningless unless the company actually uses the information, according to the article title "Conduct a Market Analysis" at VA-Interactive.com. For example, if a company discovers that customers would likely purchase a new product if it is priced between $18 and $20, the company should price its product accordingly.

Considerations

  1. Small companies should also use secondary and qualitative information along with quantitative information when interpreting survey results. Secondary information includes the size of the market, information about key competitors and even industry growth. Nielsen, the TV ratings company, and the NPD Group are companies that sell secondary research. Qualitative data is usually obtained through observation and focus groups, where sample sizes are relatively small. Companies should use all available information to better interpret quantitative research data and, consequently, make better business decisions. For example, though quantitative data may suggest consumers like a company's products, the information may be overshadowed by secondary research portending better technology on the horizon.

Prevention/Solution

  1. Quantitative data interpretation can be used to help companies identify opportunities in the marketplace. For example, a small tea distributor may discover through quantitative research that retail customers use their product for medicinal reasons. The company may deduce from these data that a new market exists for their product, and that it should consider distributing the product in health food stores.

Fri, 20 Jul 2018 03:49:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/quantitative-data-interpretation-3300.html
What Are the Disadvantages of Qualitative Measurements When Doing Marketing Research?

Jared Lewis is a professor of history, philosophy and the humanities. He has taught various courses in these fields since 2001. A former licensed financial adviser, he now works as a writer and has published numerous articles on education and business. He holds a bachelor's degree in history, a master's degree in theology and has completed doctoral work in American history.

Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:27:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/disadvantages-qualitative-measurements-doing-marketing-research-25162.html
MSc Quantitative Finance

Overview

Degree awarded
Master of Science (MSc)
Duration
1 year
Entry requirements

We require a First or Upper Second class honours degree (2:1, with 60% average) from a UK university or the overseas equivalent.

  • You ideally need a a degree in finance, economics, mathematics, statistics, physics, engineering, actuarial or decision sciences and have taken or be taking a significant number of modules in quantitative subjects, such as differential equations, econometrics or mathematical statistics in the final year of your degree, with excellent results
  • A GMAT/GRE is not required to apply for this course but in some cases The Admissions Team may request this after the initial review of your application if your degree does not contain enough relevant quantitative modules.
  • When assessing your academic record, we take into account your grade average, position in class and the standing of the institution where you studied your qualification. 

Full entry requirements

How to apply

Apply online

Course options

Full-time Part-time Full-time distance learning Part-time distance learning
MSc Y N N N

Course overview

  • Gain a good understanding of asset pricing and investment. 
  • Understand the main theories of finance, the CAPM and the Black-Scholes model.
  • Learn more interest rate models and interest rate derivatives.

Open days

Meet us at an event to find out more about our master's degree courses.

Meet us >>  

Fees

For entry in the academic year beginning September 2024, the tuition fees are as follows:

  • MSc (full-time)
    UK students (per annum): £21,000
    International, including EU, students (per annum): £33,500

Further information for EU students can be found on our dedicated EU page.

The fees quoted above will be fully inclusive for the course tuition, administration and computational costs during your studies.

Refund Policy

Due to the competition for places and limited availability, this course requires a deposit of £2,000 to cover non-recoverable costs and secure your place. The deposit will be deducted from your tuition fees when you register on the course.

The deposit is non-refundable, except in the following situations:

  • you fail to meet the conditions of your offer (see below for further information); and/or
  • you are refused a visa or entry clearance to enter the UK (proof must be submitted)

If an offer has been made specifying an English Language condition which you do not meet, the Admissions Team will require the official certificate of an English Language test taken after the date of offer as evidence that you have attempted to meet your offer conditions for a refund to be approved. The English Language test certificate provided with your application documents will not be accepted as proof that you have attempted to meet your offer conditions as such a certificate will predate the offer.

If an offer has been made specifying an academic condition, the Admissions Team will require the official university documentation showing that you have not met this academic condition from the institution at which you have studied, as evidence for a refund to be approved.

The Admissions Team reserves the right to refuse to refund of any deposit that does not meet with the requirements outlined above.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Contact us for further information about the new Accounting and Finance scholarship for UK/EU students and other scholarships available.

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Entry requirements

Academic entry qualification overview

We require a First or Upper Second class honours degree (2:1, with 60% average) from a UK university or the overseas equivalent.

  • You ideally need a a degree in finance, economics, mathematics, statistics, physics, engineering, actuarial or decision sciences and have taken or be taking a significant number of modules in quantitative subjects, such as differential equations, econometrics or mathematical statistics in the final year of your degree, with excellent results
  • A GMAT/GRE is not required to apply for this course but in some cases The Admissions Team may request this after the initial review of your application if your degree does not contain enough relevant quantitative modules.
  • When assessing your academic record, we take into account your grade average, position in class and the standing of the institution where you studied your qualification. 

English language

For the latest information on demonstrating your English proficiency for those whose first language is not English, please see our  language requirements .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements see  entry requirements for your country .

Application and selection

How to apply

Advice to applicants

Your statement of purpose should cover the areas outlined below: 

  • Tell us why you are interested in the MSc Quantitative Finance course at Alliance MBS and how the course will impact on your future
  • List any other economics, mathematics, quantitative, or finance courses or qualifications you have taken in addition to your undergraduate degree
  • Describe what makes you an outstanding applicant and describe your potential to contribute to all aspects of the course.

How your application is considered

We can only process applications with the following documents:

  • valid English language qualification
  • first and second year transcript (scanned copies are accepted at the time of application)
  • list of final year modules (where possible this should be included within the same document as your first and second year transcript)
  • statement of purpose (this is included as part of your application form, you do not need to email your statement of purpose directly to the Admissions Team)

Deferrals

To defer your offer to the following year, you must contact your admission officer to get a copy of the deferral form.  You can only defer your place for one year.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry. In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.

Course details

Course description

Our MSc Quantitative Finance programme is particularly suitable for students with a degree in Finance, Financial Economics, Actuarial Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (see  entry requirements ), as well as relevant work experience (non-compulsory). It is also suited to those wishing to gain salary enhancements, or students wishing to pursue advanced studies in quantitative finance. 

  • Learn how to forecast and manage risk and return
  • Gain the skills to price any financial instrument
  • Learn how to engineer new methods and financial products
  • Build advanced knowledge of the main theoretical and applied concepts in quantitative finance, financial engineering and risk management, using current issues to stimulate your thinking
  • Prepare for careers involving the design and management of new financial instruments, the development of innovative methods for measuring, or predicting and managing risk.

CFA training 

We have teamed up with Kaplan Schweser to facilitate student preparation for the CFA exams. 

  • MSc Accounting , MSc Accounting and Finance , MSc Finance and MSc Quantitative Finance course students who perform well in Semester one and show a strong interest in CFA will get free access to Kaplan's online training materials for CFA Part One. 
  • Gain student support from Kaplan with access to tuition material, online question banks and progress tests, and mock exam runs. Plus tutor support and 1-2-1 sessions.
  • The CFA Program builds a strong foundation of advanced investment analysis and real-world portfolio management skills. 
  • Take the first step to earning the Chartered Financial Analyst ® (CFA) credential to prepare for the Level I exam 
  • The CFA is the most respected and recognised investment designation in the world.

Trading BootCamp Week 

Together with Amplify Trading , a global financial trading and training firm, we offer a week long Trading BootCamp for MSc Accounting, MSc Accounting and Finance, MSc Finance and MSc Quantitative Finance course students. 

  • experience a live trading floor provided by two experienced traders with specialist software 
  • engage with contemporary financial markets and apply your classroom theory in practice
  • watch live breaking news, economic data and geo-political events, and use your knowledge and skills in trading different asset classes
  • a fantastic opportunity to prepare you for successful careers after graduation.
The Finance Zone    
  • gain access to one of the UK's most comprehensive collections of specialist financial and business databases that are used by top researchers around the world. 
  • Databases include Bloomberg, Datastream, Thomson ONE, Compustat, WRDS, Capital IQ and many more. Read more about the specialist financial and business databases

Special features

Worshipful Company of International Bankers Affiliation

Our accounting and finance division courses are now affiliated with the Worshipful Company of International Bankers (WCIB). Every year the best dissertation out of the following four courses will receive the WCIB Prize worth £300.

  • MSc Accounting 
  • MSc Accounting and Finance
  • MSc Finance
  • MSc Quantitative Finance

The winner will also enter the competition for the prestigious WCIB Lombard Prize

Coursework and assessment

The course teaching is shared by Alliance Manchester Business School and the School of Mathematics and Statistics and delivered through lectures, case studies, seminars and group project-based work. Assessment varies depending on course units taken.  It may include a combination of course work and examination.

Course unit details

During the course you will be taking 180 credits in all. The eight taught units during semester one and two total 120 credits and consists of both compulsory and optional taught units which can be viewed in the list below.  

Over the summer period, you will carry out your Research Dissertation, worth 60 credits. The dissertation gives you the opportunity to apply what you have learned in the taught part of the course.  Our topics are aligned with the research interests of leading financial institutions from the City of London and internationally.

Examples of recent dissertation project topics include:

  • Investigating dynamics and determinants of risk-neutral PDs
  • Using hazard models to forecast corporate bankruptcy
  • Analysing asset pricing implications from real options models
  • Pricing sovereign CDS contracts
  • Estimating liquidation probabilities of hedge funds

Course unit list

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Scholarships and bursaries

Masters scholarships for Accounting and Finance programmes for UK/EU students

We are delighted to be able to offer five scholarships available across the four Accounting and Finance programmes with a value of £10,000 towards the cost of the tuition fee. The scholarships will be awarded in line with our scholarship deadlines so early application is advisable.  Read more >>

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

This course provides ideal preparation for a career in the finance industry specialising in designing and trading financial instruments. These financial engineers are expected to be proficient in computer programming and strong in financial mathematics. They have to be at ease with complex derivatives and creative enough to find solutions for pricing and hedging. The course also provides research skills for those who wish to pursue an academic career by studying at doctoral level.

Recent recruiters

Armacell, Bank of Thailand, Barclays Capital, Bloomberg, China Merchants Bank, CIBC World Markets, Citigroup, Hewitt Associates, KPMG, Matrix, MFC Fund and Schlumberger.

Read more about graduate career destinations >>

Read about our Postgraduate Careers Service >>

Read the latest information on visa changes and opportunities in the UK for international students >>

Sat, 03 Feb 2018 22:33:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/list/10251/msc-quantitative-finance/all-content/
What the GRE Test Is and How to Prepare No result found, try new keyword!"A lot of our students, especially our students who are still in undergrad, will say, 'Oh, typically I'll study a weekend ... sections are analytical writing, quantitative reasoning and verbal ... Mon, 25 Jun 2018 03:17:00 -0500 https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/what-the-gre-test-is-and-how-to-prepare




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