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Exam Code: GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination history January 2024 by Killexams.com team

GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination

Exam Detail:
The GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination is a professional certification exam for individuals looking to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the field of wealth management. Here are the exam details for the GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I exam:

- Number of Questions: The exam typically consists of multiple-choice questions. The exact number of questions may vary, but it is generally around 100-150 questions.

- Time Limit: The time allocated to complete the exam is usually around 3-4 hours.

Course Outline:
The Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) program covers a comprehensive range of topics related to wealth management. The course outline generally includes the following areas:

1. Introduction to Wealth Management:
- Understanding the role and responsibilities of a wealth manager.
- Overview of the wealth management industry and its stakeholders.
- Ethical considerations and professional conduct in wealth management.

2. Investment and Portfolio Management:
- Principles of investment management.
- Asset allocation and diversification strategies.
- Portfolio construction and optimization techniques.
- Risk management and performance evaluation.

3. Financial Planning and Retirement:
- Comprehensive financial planning process.
- Personal financial statements and budgeting.
- Retirement planning and strategies.
- Estate planning and wealth transfer.

4. Tax Planning and Law:
- Basic concepts of tax planning.
- Tax-efficient investment strategies.
- International taxation and cross-border considerations.
- Legal and regulatory frameworks in wealth management.

5. Risk Management and Insurance:
- Risk identification and assessment.
- Insurance products and their role in risk management.
- Insurance planning for individuals and businesses.

6. Client Relationship and Communication:
- Understanding client needs and goals.
- Building and managing client relationships.
- Effective communication and presentation skills.

Exam Objectives:
The objectives of the GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I exam are as follows:

- Assessing candidates' understanding of wealth management concepts, principles, and practices.
- Evaluating candidates' ability to apply investment and portfolio management techniques.
- Testing candidates' knowledge of financial planning, retirement, tax planning, and risk management.
- Assessing candidates' familiarity with legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations in wealth management.
- Evaluating candidates' ability to effectively communicate and build client relationships.

Exam Syllabus:
The specific exam syllabus for the GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I exam covers the following topics:

1. Introduction to Wealth Management:
- Role and responsibilities of a wealth manager.
- Overview of the wealth management industry.
- Professional ethics and conduct.

2. Investment and Portfolio Management:
- Investment principles and concepts.
- Asset allocation and portfolio diversification.
- Risk management and performance evaluation.

3. Financial Planning and Retirement:
- Financial planning process and techniques.
- Personal financial statements and budgeting.
- Retirement planning and strategies.

4. Tax Planning and Law:
- Tax planning concepts and strategies.
- Tax-efficient investment techniques.
- International taxation and regulatory frameworks.

5. Risk Management and Insurance:
- Risk identification and assessment.
- Insurance products and their role in risk management.
- Insurance planning for individuals and businesses.

6. Client Relationship and Communication:
- Client needs and goal identification.
- Building and managing client relationships.
- Effective communication and presentation skills.
Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination
AAFM Examination history

Other AAFM exams

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CWM_LEVEL_II Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Certification Level II
GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination

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Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Global Examination
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Question: 89
What is burn Arbun?
A . Loan of a particular piece of property
B . Credit sale
C . Down payment
D . Deposits in trust
Answer: C
Question: 90
Urban land means land situated in area not being more than ………………from local list of local authority as
notification in official Gazette
A . 5 km
B . 8 km
C . 10 km
D . 20 km
Answer: B
Question: 91
Which of the following is allowed as deduction from net annual value of a property?
A . Repairs & collection charges
B . Insurance premium
C . Interest on loan borrowed for repairs
D . All the above
Answer: C
Question: 92
IFSC stands for:
A . Inter-bank Financial Sector Code
B . Inter-bank Funds Settlement code
C . Inter-bank Financial Service Code
D . None of the above
Answer: B
Question: 93
Surender the driver causes injuries to a pedestrian by rash driving of car. The injured victim had to spend Rs.1000 in
treating his injuries. Surender ‘s act has created liabilities under
A . Common law
B . Contract
C . Statue and Common law
D . Statute only
Answer: C
Question: 94
For a “single income family” priority is on
A . Protecting income via a term plan
B . Investing in commodities to grow wealth
C . Investing in Mutual Funds to grow wealth
D . None of the above
Answer: A
Question: 95
A public trust is created for the benefit of
A . Individuals only
B . Family member
C . Uncertain and fluctuating body of persons
D . Charitable purposes only
Answer: C
Question: 96
Any amount payable and the amount of refund due under the Income Tax Act,1961 shall be rounded off to the nearest
multiple of……….?
A . Rs. 10
B . Rs. 1
C . Rs. 100
D . No rounded off is done
Answer: A
Question: 97
Under the Provisions of Transfer, of Property Act, the unborn child acquires vested interest-
A . Upon his birth
B . 7 days after his birth
C . 12 days after his birth
D . 18 years after his birth
Answer: A
Question: 98
Unabsorbed depreciation can be carried forward for ____________.
A . 8 Years
B . 4 Years
C . Indefinite
D . None
Answer: C
Question: 99
What is the minimum amount one can deposit in a PPF account in a financial?
A . Rs. 400 per annum
B . Rs. 500 per annum
C . Rs. 100/-per annum
D . Rs. 5/-per annum
Answer: B
Question: 100
SHG stands for:
A . Society Housing Group
B . Society Household Group
C . Self House Group
D . Self Help Group
Answer: D
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AAFM Examination history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I Search results AAFM Examination history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GLO_CWM_LEVEL_I https://killexams.com/exam_list/AAFM Necessary Elements of a Dermatologic History and Physical Evaluation

Introduction

The skin is the largest and most visible organ of the body. A large percentage of primary care visits are dermatology related. The skin reflects the internal well-being of the body and can develop manifestations of systemic illness. The nurse's ability to recognize and accurately describe lesions can lead to prompt diagnosis and treatment of conditions, helping the patient to avoid discomfort, systemic illness, or death. To accurately describe skin findings, the nurse should know the names and defining characteristics of several important primary lesions (Dains, Baumann, & Scheibel, 1998) (see Table 1 ).

When lesions are found it is important to record their distribution, arrangement, and morphology (Sams & Lynch, 1996). Describing the distribution is valuable because many skin diseases have characteristic locations that may provide clues to diagnosis. Arrangement patterns are also important clues. Some typical patterns include linear, grouped, oval, round, annular, iris, polygonal, serpiginous, umbilicated, zosteriform, and morbilliform (see Table 2 ). Morphology is described in terms of size, color, consistency, configuration, margination, and surface characteristics (Sams & Lynch, 1996).

Secondary skin lesions are lesions that have changed from their primary appearance due to natural evolution, scratching, secondary infection, or treatment. Some examples are scale, crust, erosion, ulcer, lichenification, scar, keloid, excoriation, fissure, and atrophy.

In the primary care setting there are two ways skin lesions may come to the attention of a clinician. They may be the reason the person is seeking care, the chief complaint, or they may be found incidentally while performing a general physical examination.

Taking a history first and then performing a physical examination is the accepted way to gather information in general medicine and in specialty practices. In dermatology, many authors advocate making a brief initial physical assessment before conducting the history (Dains et al., 1998; Fitzpatrick, Johnson, Polano, Suurmond, & Wolff, 1994; Sams & Lynch, 1996). Others recommend examination and history taking concurrently (Bates, Bickley, & Hoekelman, 1995; Jackson, Alghareeb, Alaradi, Ibrahim, & Tomi, 1999) (see Figure 1). Figure 1 represents an innovative form which also contains guiding information to help providers maximize coding levels for examinations, thereby improving practice income. The form in Figure 1 can be completed by the patient in the waiting area. It begins with a reassurance of confidentiality and at the end, includes a description of what can be expected in a "full body exam," a part of a dermatological visit that sometimes causes anxiety. The form enables the patient to record his/her health history in an unhurried manner. Listing specific examples of potential problems in a check-off format, helps assure that all pertinent health information can be reviewed efficiently. Page 2 of the form creates a uniform format for multiple practitioners to quickly review previous visits and record their findings. It facilitates asking about the progress of past problems and modify in plans to improve patient outcomes.

Figure 1.

Sample History and Physical Form

After an initial examination, history taking will be more focused and productive. This approach also facilitates prompt intervention if there is a life-threatening condition.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 09:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/447729
Document Examination

Purpose

To determine authenticity and authorship.

Method

The specifics of an investigation will depend on the nature of the document being studied (e.g., historical or personal) and the goals of the inquiry. Generally speaking, a document will be examined from three different aspects: historical, scientific, and stylistic.

Video:
Authentication

Tips on how to authenticate a document by comparing handwriting.

Historical Analysis

It is virtually impossible to pinpoint the age of an undated document, but there may be clues to the era. If it is a printed piece - say a greeting card - the method of printing, address, and even the stamp may be important.

At the very least, materials and techniques must be consistent with place and time. Many forgeries are identified by the presence of materials that didn’t exist at the time alleged.

Scientific Analysis

A detailed paper analysis will detect every shred of physical evidence concealed in a document.

Stylistic Analysis

Comparisons of style are essential for authentication. Penmanship, cultural phrasing, and form of address can help to identify both the era and author. Handwriting comparisons can authenticate a signature or manuscript.

In some cases, all of it taken together can’t solve a historical puzzle. For example, there are five known manuscript copies of the Gettysburg Address. Testing has proved that all are authentic Lincoln documents. But it will never prove, definitively, which of the five Lincoln actually read from at Gettysburg.

Mon, 20 Mar 2023 10:19:00 -0500 text/html https://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/technique/document-examination/
Our History

C-SPAN is a public service.

We are a non-profit created in 1979 by a then-new industry called cable television, and today we remain true to our founding principles, providing gavel-to-gavel coverage of the workings of the U.S. Congress, both the House and Senate, all without editing, commentary or analysis.

Over the years, we've grown to be so much more – on TV, online, on radio, through podcasts and on social platforms (YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram). We supplement live coverage of the Capitol with ideologically balanced programming concerning all manner of public policy and politics. In so doing, we promote open and transparent dialogue between the public and their elected and appointed officials – and those campaigning for office.

Underpinning this impartial, balanced coverage is the fact that no government or taxpayer dollars support C-SPAN, as we continue to be funded as a public service from your cable or satellite provider.

C-SPAN began with only four employees: Brian Lamb, Jana Dabrowski Fay, Don Houle and Brian Lockman. Those four transmitted the first television feed from the U.S. House of Representatives to C-SPAN viewers on March 19, 1979, the first day the House allowed television coverage of its floor debates. That televised congressional session began with a one-minute speech by then-Congressman Al Gore and reached just 3 million American cable and satellite homes.

For C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb and the nascent network's cable system affiliates that provide its funding, the televised House feed was only the beginning. C-SPAN added what became its signature call-in programs the following year to provide a direct conduit between the American public and the nation's political leaders. That direct viewer-to-leader dialogue and discussion of current events continues each day on Washington Journal.

In 1982, the network expanded from eight to 16, and then 24 hours, enabling it to add a wider variety of public affairs programming to viewers while maintaining its commitment to carry the proceedings of the U.S. House, live and gavel-to-gavel.

In 1986, the U.S. Senate voted to televise its debates, and C-SPAN launched a second channel, C-SPAN2, to provide unfiltered, gavel-to-gavel access to that body.

When the House and Senate are in session, C-SPAN commits to covering both bodies live and in their entirety. This is a voluntary commitment; there is no contract with Congress to carry its proceedings.

In 2001, C-SPAN3 was launched to provide access to additional public affairs events, particularly live coverage of key congressional hearings.

On weekends, ever since 1998, C-SPAN2 becomes Book TV, which covers non-fiction book and author events; and C-SPAN3 becomes American History TV, created in 2011, to offer historical lectures, oral histories and special history series.

C-SPAN also extensively covers the president and the executive branch, including regular coverage of the daily White House and Department of State briefings. Coverage of the Supreme Court has been more challenging. Beginning in 1988, with a letter to then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist, C-SPAN has consistently called for the Supreme Court to allow cameras to cover its approximately 75 hours of annual oral arguments. To date, the court has refused this request. The network has televised more than 100 oral arguments before federal courts, which do allow cameras, as well as many state supreme courts.

In 1993, C-SPAN created the C-SPAN Bus, a 45-foot interactive learning center to travel across the nation visiting schools and community events in partnership with C-SPAN's cable providers. Bus visitors engage with C-SPAN representatives and interactive tools to learn about our unique public affairs programming and online resources. Most recently, we rolled out the C-SPAN 'Cities Tour,' which explores the American story through weeklong visits to U.S. communities to record local history and authors.

In 1997, we added C-SPAN Radio, available in the Washington, D.C., area and via a mobile app.

In 2010, C-SPAN launched the Video Library. All C-SPAN content, since 1987, is archived on our website and is free for public use – now with nearly a quarter million hours of primary source video and growing every day.

Our deep multi-platform presence – television, audio, social platforms and our website – makes C-SPAN the go-to resource for political journalists, Capitol Hill staff, members of Congress and the interested public. In the current media marketplace, there's no other place quite like C-SPAN, and perhaps none more trusted. C-SPAN’s highly motivated viewers know they are getting a unique product, one with a special place in the news media.

C-SPAN is the recipient of dozens of national awards and citations, including three George Foster Peabody Awards: one for institutional excellence in 1993, one in the historical documentary category for its 1999 American Presidents series, and one in 2011 for the C-SPAN online Video Library.

Forty years ago, C-SPAN first put the U.S. House of Representatives on television, opening a window for viewers to get an unfiltered view of government. While Washington may have changed, we haven't. Our unblinking eye on Congress and public debate continues. The window is still open, giving the world a front-row-seat to democracy – allowing you to make up your own mind.

Fri, 07 Apr 2023 11:08:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.c-span.org/about/history/
Best No Exam Life Insurance Companies of January 2024

Our experts answer readers' insurance questions and write unbiased product reviews (here's how we assess insurance products). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners; however, our opinions are our own.

Many of the best life insurance companies offer no-exam life insurance, which has the obvious appeal of skipping medical exams. 

Featured No Exam Life Insurance Companies from Our Partners

Ethos Life

Insider’s Rating
A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star
4.37/5
Icon of check mark inside a promo stamp It indicates a confirmed selection.
Perks

Apply for life insurance online in just a few minutes with Ethos' simple application. No medical exams are required. Just answer a few health questions—many customers enjoy same-day coverage!

JD Power Customer Satisfaction Rating

Not Rated

AM Best Financial Strength Rating

A

Pros
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. 100% online application process, quotes in minutes
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Coverage starts immediately once approved
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Term policies renewable up to age 94 for qualifying applicants
Cons
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. No conversion options to turn term policies to whole life for no exam policies
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Whole life policy limits are lower

SBLI Life Insurance

Insider’s Rating
A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star
3.56/5

AM Best Financial Strength Rating

A

Pros
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Whole and term life insurance products
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Final expense options
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Diverse life insurance riders available
Cons
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Company does not post important information like limits on its site
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. No universal life insurance options
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Age limit of 60 on accelerated underwriting

Bestow Life

Insider’s Rating
A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star
3.37/5

AM Best Financial Strength Rating

A+

Pros
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Premiums as low as $8/month
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Easy online access
Cons
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Company only offers term policies
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Limited support for customer needs
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Maximum coverage limits are low

Complete Editorial Review of the Best No Exam Life Insurance Companies

  • Ethos Life: Best Term Life Policy
  • AARP Life Insurance: Best for Seniors
  • USAA Life Insurance: Best for Military Members
  • Prudential Life Insurance: Best for Higher Policy Limits
  • Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance: Best for Guaranteed Acceptance
  • AAA Life Insurance: Best for Waiting Period

Compare the Best No Exam Life Insurance 

Many insurers offer a range of permanent and term life insurance policies that require a medical exam. These companies offer the best no medical exam life insurance policies. 

Best Term Life Policy

Ethos No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Ethos Life accepts applicants up to age 65 with a 100% online application process, and limits are as high as $2 million. 

Ethos Life asks a few basic medical questions, but coverage is effective immediately once approved. In addition, every customer buying policies like this from Ethos Life is eligible for a 30-day look period, which is another way to say you can cancel and get your money back in the first 30 days with no penalties.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $2 million
  • Age: 20-65
  • Waiting period: May apply
  • Unique feature: Instant quotes available with a streamlined online application

Ethos Life Insurance Review

Best for Seniors

AARP No Medical Exam Life Insurance

AARP Life Insurance caters to senior clients for insurance and many other financial products. Older adults between 50 and 74 may qualify as long as they are AARP members. Term policies are available with limits up to $150,000 in most states. Montana and New York residents may be eligible for up to $100,000. Whole life policy limits max out at $25,000.

Whole life policies can be issued without any health exams or medical questions. The term policies, on the other hand, may ask some health questions.

  • Health questions: For term life policies, but not whole
  • Coverage limits: Up to $150,000
  • Age: 50-74
  • Unique feature: No medical exam policy caters to older adults

AARP Life Insurance Review

Best for Military Members

USAA No Medical Exam Life Insurance

USAA Life Insurance is typically associated with military members and their immediate family members, but its insurance products are available to anyone. Pricing is lower, payouts are higher, and customer service is strong. Of course, these services are only available to military and qualifying family members. For the children of a deceased military member to use any USAA products, the military member would need to be signed up before their death.

Guaranteed whole life policies are available in 49 states, excluding Montana. USAA life insurance coverage is available from $2,000 to $25,000 with no medical exam or questions. Applicants who want higher coverage limits can explore medical exam policy options with a licensed agent.

  • Health questions: No
  • Coverage limits: Up to $25,000
  • Age: 45-85
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: Below-market product costs available for military members and qualifying family

USAA Life Insurance Review

Best for Higher Policy Limits

Prudential No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Prudential Life Insurance offers up to $3 million in coverage for term life policies. Adults up to 60 years old are eligible for coverage with a short application involving some medical questions. For younger applicants, conversion options may also be available later to make term policies into whole life policies. However, due to the higher limits, Prudential's application process may also be longer.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $3 million
  • Age: 20-60
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: High expert and customer rankings with a trusted provider

Prudential Life Insurance Review

Best for Guaranteed Acceptance

Mutual of Omaha No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance has high financial stability and customer satisfaction ratings across different types of insurance. Guaranteed life policies are available for adults between the ages of 45 and 85. In New York state, the age range is 50-75. Policies can be as small as $2,000 in most states and as large as $25,000 with no health questions or medical exams.

Mutual of Omaha's no medical exam policies have a graded death benefit. If you die within two years of the policy start date, the company will not pay the full policy. Instead, it delivers 110% of the premiums paid. The Mutual of Omaha website boasts same-day payouts on most policies. Policies for children are also available.

  • Health questions: No
  • Coverage limits: Up to $25,000
  • Age: 45-85 (50-75 in New York State)
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: Company website lists same-day payment on most claims

Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance Review

Best for Waiting Period

AAA No Medical Exam Life Insurance

AAA Life Insurance offers immediate death benefits for qualified applicants between 18 and 75. In other words, once your policy starts, you are eligible for the full policy benefit. Policies are available with limits as low as $25,000 and as high as $500,000. While a medical exam is not required, health questions are.

AAA offers term policies with limits as high as $500,000. For a whole life policy, the limit is $25,000. But applicants can add a rider doubling the payout for accidental death coverage. Younger people have no waiting period for benefits. For applicants over age 45, AAA pays out 130% of the premiums paid up to the date of death for the first two years.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $500,000 term/$25,000 whole
  • Age: 18-75
  • Waiting period: Applies after age 45
  • Unique feature: Death benefit available regardless of the cause of death

No Medical Exam Life Insurance FAQs

A no medical exam life insurance policy could be right for you if you're able to qualify and don't need special coverage. These policies are the easiest to get for young applicants with no significant health issues. Older applicants can buy with some companies, but acceptance is not guaranteed. No medical exam policies offer less coverage with higher premiums in most cases. If you do not qualify for the no medical exam policy you want, insurance agents can help you explore alternatives. 

No medical exam means life insurance companies will not check your blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. However, companies have access to prescription history and other personal records, and underwriters base decisions partly on this history.

You'll have to decide whether you prefer a whole or term policy based on your situation if you're getting no medical life insurance. A term policy has an expiration date, and extensions or conversions to a whole life policy are not guaranteed. If anything, your rate may be higher if you try to convert your policy. The insurer looks at you just as it would any other applicant of your age, health, etc. A whole life policy locks in premiums and payouts.

There are alternatives to a new medical exam life insurance policy. Insurance agents can quote you medical exam policies if you're denied a no medical exam option. An experienced agent may be able to assess your application before starting the process to avoid official denials. If you're concerned about premium limits, you can explore options like IUL (indexed universal life) for permanent life insurance that increases your benefit as long as you make premium payments.

A no medical exam life insurance policy may hold a certain appeal for older applicants and those in failing health. However, the life insurance market is the opposite of what you might expect. These policies are best for young people (typically under 50 years old) in good health. The no medical exam process is often more efficient, streamlining your approval, and life insurance companies can only do this with low-risk applicants.

If a provider sees red flags that might disqualify you, it won't necessarily prevent you from getting coverage. Instead, the agent would most likely offer to run more conventional life insurance quotes for you.

Guaranteed issue life insurance policies do not require a medical exam. This type of life insurance is typically limited to people ages 50 or older, and the tradeoff is that policies are usually more expensive than ones that do require a medical exam. That said, if your health conditions would otherwise prevent you from getting a life insurance policy, guaranteed issue insurance is a useful option, and it's offered by a variety of insurers including AIG, AAA, New York Life, and Gerber Life.

Yes, you can really get life insurance without a medical exam, but your options will be different. That's because you'll need to choose a guaranteed issue policy — a specific type of insurance that lets you bypass the medical exam requirement — and it will probably cost more than a regular policy including a medical exam.

The highest amount of life insurance you can get without a medical exam is lower than what you could get with a medical exam. Guaranteed issue policies that don't require medical exams typically top out at $25,000 or $50,000 in coverage, while standard life insurance policies can offer millions in coverage.

How to Pick the Best No Medical Exam Life Insurance Policy for You

Particularly when choosing life insurance, customization is critical. Buyers don't need to add every rider, but a little research goes a long way in selecting the right company. Some applicants will not qualify for a no medical exam life insurance policy. A life insurance agent can help you run quotes that make sense for you. Then agents can offer realistic insurance policy options and review the costs and benefits of each.

Asking friends and family which insurance agent they use could be your first step to finding the right life policy. Factors like age, medical history, and financial goals play key roles in your decision. So we do not recommend asking loved ones about individual policies. Instead, let a qualified insurance professional find the best policies for you.

Why You Should Trust Us: How We Chose the Best No Exam Life Insurance

The coverage and riders offered are vital parts of our evaluation. We also look at the speed of payouts, customer satisfaction, and financial strength ratings. All of these factor into the immediate and long-term performance of the life insurance companies we review.

If you're looking for more information about a specific life insurer, our individual reviews offer a deep dive into individual policies, riders, and more. The same considerations are used for all competitors to ensure readers have the edge to make informed decisions in an ever-changing market.

See our insurance rating methodology for more details.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 09:59:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-no-medical-exam-life-insurance
Welcome to History

Native American peoples inhabited and visited the landscape encompassed within Wyoming for centuries prior to the founding of the University of Wyoming (UW) in 1887 and we would like to acknowledge the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Crow, Lakota, Shoshone, and Ute, on whose land we stand today.

Long committed to the history of the American West, the History Department at UW is uniquely positioned to situate this field in a global context. Drawing on expertise ranging from Europe, East and Central Asia, Africa, and the Americas, we strive to explore historical questions with thematic as well as comparative approaches. Our goal is to give students a truly global perspective on history.

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A HISTORY DEGREE?

 At the most basic level, history teaches how to assess evidence, to access conflicting interpretations, to arrive at convincing arguments, and to speak and write about these arguments to a wide variety of audiences. These skills make history one of the foremost majors that graduate and professional schools and employers seek when they admit graduate students or hire employees. Viewed from a practical perspective, a history degree provides lifelong skills that are in demand in fields ranging from teaching and law to government and business administration. History is a very useful degree.

History is a foundational discipline that blends the methodologies and perspective of the humanities and social sciences in order to engage with the history of human culture on a global scale. UW's History degree program emphasizes interdisciplinary teaching and research and provides course work, research experiences, and internships on both American and international topics. The History program offers a Bachelor of Arts degree major and minor, and a Master of Arts degree.

WHY STUDY HISTORY?

Who hasn’t heard someone say, “I just love history?” Maybe that person is you? History is a vibrant and fascinating study of people, events, and institutions in the past and, for many people, that’s reason enough to earn a history degree. But there are larger and more practical reasons to choose history as your major. Here are a few of those reasons that historian Peter Stearns complied for the American Historical Association:

  • History Helps Us Understand People and Societies
  • History Helps Us Understand Change
  • History Helps Us Understand How the Society We Live in Came to Be
  • History Provides Identity
  • Studying History Is Essential for Good Citizenship

In addition to the historical content obtained in your coursework, a degree in History also provides excellent training in rigorous analysis and research skills, and the oral and written skills necessary to achieve success in any top-flight professional career. Typical career paths for History graduates include work in museums and archives, national security agencies (the FBI, CIA, and NSA all love to recruit History B.A. students), and the Department of State. The History major is also excellent preparation for various professional schools, such as law and medicine, as well as post-graduate work in the humanities and social sciences.  We pride ourselves on placing our graduates in highly competitive careers and post-graduate masters and doctoral programs.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES 

Bachelor's Degree (B.A.)

The History Department Faculty has identified the specific objectives of its undergraduate curriculum. The following are the learning outcomes that each History major should learn. We are continuously and actively assessing our program to ensure that these learning outcomes are being met.

1. Students shall be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating historical information from multiple sources.

2. Students will develop the ability to distinguish between different culturally historical perspectives.

3. Students will produce well researched written work that engages with both primary sources and the secondary literature.

4. Students will develop an informed familiarity with multiple cultures.

5. Students will employ a full range of historical techniques and methods.

6. Students will develop an ability to convey verbally their historical knowledge.

7. Students will demonstrate their understanding of historical cause and effect along with their knowledge of the general chronology of human experience.

8. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts of historical theary and/or conceptual frameworks and be able to use these in their own studies. 

 

Graduate Degrees (M.A. and M.A.T.)

The History Department offers two distinct graduate programs. Any field of study offered by the Department can be accommodated within either degree program.

The M.A. degree is designed to prepare the student for employment opportunities and PhD-level work. This degree program is also suitable for students interested in careers as community college instructors as well as for lifelong learners who seek formal advanced education.

 

Students who graduate with an M.A. in History will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the theories and methodologies of the discipline of History.

2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historiography of their field of specialization.

3. Demonstrate some understanding of comparative and/or thematic methods, approaches, and theories.

4. Conduct original research based on primary sources and construct an argument based on that research.

5. Write graduate-level expository prose and orally present their ideas at an advanced level.

 

The M.A.T. degree is designed to enhance the teaching of history and related disciplines by secondary and middle school teachers. This is a non-thesis degree, designed to provide breadth of preparation rather than specialization. Applicants are expected to have already completed their certification and pedagogy courses.

Students who graduate with an M.A.T. in History will be able to:

1. Demonstrate the significance of historical topics with reference to broader historical context, historiographic trends, or contemporary relevance.

2. Construct original historical arguments using a blend of primary and secondary source material.

3. Demonstrate a superior quality of writing both in terms of mechanics and in developing an argument effectively.

4. Convey a broad understanding of historical material suitable for teaching.

Thu, 10 Aug 2023 03:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uwyo.edu/history/index.html
History at UAB

The Department of History is offering two $5,000 scholarships to deserving students who transfer from another college into UAB as history majors. Applicants should demonstrate academic promise and a commitment to the study of History.

To apply, send your college transcript, a one-page description of why you are interested in studying history, and some of your career aspirations are to Dr. Walter Ward at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Tue, 28 Aug 2012 11:51:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/cas/history/
Document Examination

Purpose

To determine authenticity and authorship.

Method

The specifics of an investigation will depend on the nature of the document being studied (e.g., historical or personal) and the goals of the inquiry. Generally speaking, a document will be examined from three different aspects: historical, scientific, and stylistic.

Video:
Authentication

Tips on how to authenticate a document by comparing handwriting.

Historical Analysis

It is virtually impossible to pinpoint the age of an undated document, but there may be clues to the era. If it is a printed piece - say a greeting card - the method of printing, address, and even the stamp may be important.

At the very least, materials and techniques must be consistent with place and time. Many forgeries are identified by the presence of materials that didn’t exist at the time alleged.

Scientific Analysis

A detailed paper analysis will detect every shred of physical evidence concealed in a document.

Stylistic Analysis

Comparisons of style are essential for authentication. Penmanship, cultural phrasing, and form of address can help to identify both the era and author. Handwriting comparisons can authenticate a signature or manuscript.

In some cases, all of it taken together can’t solve a historical puzzle. For example, there are five known manuscript copies of the Gettysburg Address. Testing has proved that all are authentic Lincoln documents. But it will never prove, definitively, which of the five Lincoln actually read from at Gettysburg.

Mon, 15 Aug 2022 09:01:00 -0500 text/html https://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/technique/document-examination/index.html
Our History

The Smithsonian Institution was established with funds from James Smithson (1765–1829), a British scientist who left his estate to the United States to found “at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” On August 10, 1846, the U.S. Senate passed the act organizing the Smithsonian Institution, which was signed into law by President James K. Polk.

Congress authorized acceptance of the Smithson bequest on July 1, 1836, but it took another ten years of debate before the Smithsonian was founded. Once established, the Smithsonian became part of the process of developing an American national identity—an identity rooted in exploration, innovation, and a unique American style. That process continues today as the Smithsonian looks toward the future.

James Smithson and the Founding of the Smithsonian

James Smithson
James Smithson, c. 1765-1829
Artist: Hattie Elizabeth Burdette

Smithson, the illegitimate child of a wealthy Englishman, had traveled much during his life, but had never once set foot on American soil. Why, then, would he decide to give the entirety of his sizable estate—which totaled half a million dollars, or 1/66 of the United States' entire federal budget at the time—to a country that was foreign to him?

Some speculate it was because he was denied his father's legacy. Others argue that he was inspired by the United States' experiment with democracy. Some attribute his philanthropy to ideals inspired by such organizations as the Royal Institution, which was dedicated to using scientific knowledge to improve human conditions. Smithson never wrote about or discussed his bequest with friends or colleagues, so we are left to speculate on the ideals and motivations of a gift that has had such significant impact on the arts, humanities, and sciences in the United States.

Visitors can pay homage to Smithson with a visit to his crypt, located on the first floor of the Smithsonian Castle.

Learn more about James Smithson »

Smithsonian Institution General History

James Polk
James Knox Polk, 2 Nov 1795-15 Jun 1849
Artist: Max Westfield

Smithson died in 1829, and six years later, President Andrew Jackson announced the bequest to Congress. On July 1, 1836, Congress accepted the legacy bequeathed to the nation and pledged the faith of the United States to the charitable trust. In September 1838, Smithson's legacy, which amounted to more than 100,000 gold sovereigns, was delivered to the mint at Philadelphia. Recoined in U.S. currency, the gift amounted to more than $500,000.

After eight years of sometimes heated debate, an Act of Congress signed by President James K. Polk on Aug. 10, 1846, established the Smithsonian Institution as a trust to be administered by a Board of Regents and a Secretary of the Smithsonian. Since its founding, more than 175 years ago, the Smithsonian has become the world's largest museum, education, and research complex, with 21 museums, the National Zoo, and nine research facilities.

Learn more about our history from Smithsonian Institution Archives »

Architectural History & Historic Preservation Division »

Wed, 22 Feb 2023 02:11:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.si.edu/About/History
Best No-Medical-Exam Life Insurance Companies

Final Verdict

All of the companies on this list represent good options for getting life insurance without a medical exam. All are A+ rated or better for financial strength and have received fewer complaints than expected when averaged over a three-year period. If you don’t need more than $3 million in coverage and are 50 or younger, any company on this list could be a good fit. But if you’re over 50 and looking for a death benefit of more than $1 million, you can rule out Nationwide. If you’re over 60, your only option for high-coverage no-medical-exam life insurance is Penn Mutual. And regardless of your age, Penn Mutual is your only option if you need a death benefit greater than $5 million and don’t want to take an exam.

If you’re looking for term coverage, try Penn Mutual or Pacific Life; for dividends, Penn Mutual or Guardian. If you want free living benefits, look to Nationwide. And if you’d like a wellness plan with your life insurance, John Hancock delivers.

How To Choose a No-Medical-Exam Life Insurance Policy

Term life insurance is designed to last for a specific number of years, such as 30, and then expire. Permanent life insurance is designed to last your entire lifetime, and is therefore more expensive than term. You may also want to combine term and permanent policies to have a higher-coverage term policy during your working years or while you’re raising a family, and then a lower-coverage permanent policy that will kick in once the term coverage expires.

Term policies let you choose the length of the term (a 40-year term is the longest we’ve seen), and often provide the option to convert your term coverage to permanent. Permanent policies have a cash value, which may be accessed via withdrawals and loans.

Once you’ve figured out your budget and the general type of coverage you need, you should begin to get quotes from financially stable companies with track records of good customer satisfaction. 

If you want a no-exam life insurance policy, it may be helpful to know that most of the 91 companies we reviewed offer some sort of policy that doesn’t require an exam. You’re best off first finding a good company (or a few you like), and then seeing what kind of policy you can get without an exam. This list and our rankings of the best life insurance companies are both good places to start. And be sure to compare multiple quotes for no-exam life insurance because some policies are cheaper than others (depending on the type of no-exam underwriting used).

A number of companies offer life insurance policies without requiring a medical exam, but you’ll generally be eligible for the lowest premiums with those that ask thorough health questions on the application. 

More Ratings of Top Life Insurance Companies

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Most any type of policy is eligible for no-exam underwriting. It used to be that if you wanted to skip the exam, only low-coverage insurance policies were available to you. These are still available and sold as burial or funeral insurance, or guaranteed-issue policies. But now, insurers have a number of sophisticated means by which to collect health and other information, so they don’t need to rely on your exam. Plus, it costs them money to administer it and time to receive and review the results. No-exam underwriting allows insurance carriers to issue life policies faster, which is often good for both the customer and the insurer.

    So whether you’re looking for term or permanent coverage, a whole life policy or an indexed universal life policy, it’s available somewhere without a medical exam. But not all companies offer no-exam life insurance on all or even any of their policies, so you’ll need to do some research to find one that does. (The companies in the list above are an excellent start.) The one caveat is that not everyone is eligible for no-exam underwriting. If you have health issues that raise red flags for the insurance company, you may be required to undergo a medical screening to complete your application.

  • Yes, if it's a policy with a cash value. No-exam life insurance policies are just like regular life insurance policies. The only difference is that a medical screening is not required during the application process. Once approved, the policy functions just as it would had you taken an exam. So if you’ve purchased a permanent life insurance policy that builds a cash value, that cash value will be available to you, subject to any surrender period or other standard policy conditions.

  • Choosing the best life insurance policy for you depends on your life insurance needs. How much coverage do you need? (Ideally, you’ll get enough to pay off your debts and replace your income, at the very least.) How long do you need it for? Your needs may change once your kids are grown and your home is paid off, for instance. The next question to ask is, how much premium can you afford?

Methodology

In order to compile our list of the best no-medical-exam life insurance companies, we developed a comprehensive life insurance methodology. We started off by researching what consumers want from life insurance companies, and for that, we looked to third-party consumer studies, including J.D. Power’s 2021 U.S. Life Insurance New Business Study and the 2021 Insurance Barometer Study, by Life Happens and LIMRA.

With those findings in mind, we gathered more than 50 data points on 91 life insurance companies, including ratings for financial strength, customer satisfaction, and customer complaints, as well as information about years in business, online tools, no-exam options, dividends, maximum issue ages, and available riders. 

Our review process gave preference to companies with solid financials, few customer complaints, high no-exam coverage amounts available, high-issue ages for no-exam coverage, and a broad product portfolio. Companies received ratings boosts for online resources, including online quotes and live chat, and included living benefit riders. We ranked each company according to the following categories and weights.

  • 28%: No-med-exam availability and features
  • 20% Policy types and features
  • 15%: Financial stability 
  • 15%: Customer satisfaction
  • 13%: Ease of application
  • 9%: Online resources

To finalize our list, we compared individual offerings between top companies by considering ratings from third parties such as AM Best and J.D. Power, and delving deeper into product specifics—including cost and the availability of dividends. We used this research to determine the best no-medical-exam life insurance companies.

Mon, 12 Oct 2020 06:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/best-no-medical-exam-life-insurance-5078737
The Best No-Exam Life Insurance Companies

Top 5 No-Exam Life Insurance Companies

These are our picks for the top five life insurance companies that offer no-exam coverage:

What Is No-Exam Life Insurance?

A no-exam life insurance policy does not require applicants to complete a medical exam to be considered for approval. Rather, it follows an accelerated underwriting process to approve applicants quickly. Common no-exam options include term life, whole life and final expense.

There are two types of no-exam life insurance: simplified-issue and guaranteed-issue. Simplified-issue life insurance policies do not require a medical exam but still ask questions about your health and base approval on your answers.

By contrast, guaranteed-issue life insurance policies require no exam and ask no health questions, meaning eligible applicants are guaranteed coverage. Of the two, guaranteed-issue life policies are usually more expensive.

If you are worried about the effect that chronic illness or other health issues might have on your policy premiums, or if you have been denied regular coverage in the past, no-exam coverage might be your best option. However, it is costlier than a regular policy due to the increased risk the insurer takes on by not knowing your medical history.

Pros of No-Exam Life Insurance

  • Fast approval: The underwriting process for no-exam policies is generally faster, which means you can get approved more quickly compared to a traditional policy.
  • Ideal for those with pre-existing conditions: A no-exam policy will suit you more if you have pre-existing conditions, as traditional insurers might not extend you coverage.
  • Easy application process: Because there is no required doctor’s visit, you do not need to leave home to apply for no-exam life insurance.

Cons of No-Exam Life Insurance

  • Higher cost: You will generally pay higher premiums for a no-exam life insurance policy because the insurer assumes more risk.
  • Lower coverage limits: A no-exam policy might not be sufficient for your financial needs because it generally has lower coverage limits than a traditional policy.

How Much Does a No-Exam Life Insurance Policy Cost?

The cost of a no-exam policy varies based on the individual. However, when you hold all other factors constant, a no-exam policy will be more expensive than a traditional life insurance policy. An insurance provider assumes more risk with a no-exam policy because it cannot easily estimate when or if it will have to make a death benefit payout.

Your coverage limits and chosen policy type significantly affect how much you will pay for the policy. For instance, if you opt for a policy with a 10-year term and a $30,000 death benefit, it will cost less than a policy with a 10-year term and a $50,000 death benefit. Insurers look at other factors when determining your premiums, including age, gender, lifestyle, hobbies, health status and driving history.

If you are a smoker or have high-risk hobbies like rock climbing, you will generally pay more for a policy. In some instances, insurers charge more to insure men than women — because women statistically live longer on average — but pricing does not change based on gender in all states. Since every insurer evaluates applications differently, we recommend that you shop around and compare rates for the best deal.


Is No-Exam Life Insurance Worth It?

The major advantages of no-medical-exam life insurance policies include the ability to get coverage without disclosing details about your health or to get coverage quickly — sometimes instantly. Life insurance without an exam can be worth it if you suffer from any chronic medical conditions, have been denied traditional life insurance in the past or need coverage fast.

However, it’s important to note that lying on your application could be considered insurance fraud, and insurers can still access your health history during the underwriting process without a physical exam.

Due to the inherent risk of offering life insurance without insight into your health, insurers tend to provide only limited coverage at expensive rates if you choose a no-exam policy. If you are in good health, need a sizable death benefit or are shopping on a tight budget, no-exam life insurance may not be worth looking into.

Our Conclusion on The Best No-Exam Life Insurance Companies

While traditional life insurance can offer lower rates and more comprehensive coverage, no-exam life insurance has a swift application process that provides coverage without requiring you to undergo a physical health exam. However, each policy has its benefits and limitations.

Your coverage needs, timeline and budget can help determine the right policy for you. We gathered our top six providers offering no-exam life insurance coverage in this article. We recommend you gather quotes from at least three providers before deciding on a policy.

Our goal at the Guides Home Team is to provide you with comprehensive, unbiased recommendations you can trust. To rate and rank life insurance companies, we created a thorough methodology and analyzed each company by combing through online policy information, speaking to agents via phone, reading customer reviews for insight into the typical customer experience, and reviewing third-party financial reliability scores. After collecting this data, we scored each company in the following categories: coverage, riders, availability and ease of use and brand trust. To learn more, read our full life insurance methodology for reviewing and scoring providers.

AM Best Disclaimer

Fri, 27 Jan 2023 02:28:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/guides/insurance-services/best-no-exam-life-insurance/




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