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CFRN Certified Flight Registered Nurse test | https://www.flatoffindexing.com/

CFRN test - Certified Flight Registered Nurse Updated: 2024

Precisely same CFRN dumps questions as in real test, WTF!
Exam Code: CFRN Certified Flight Registered Nurse test January 2024 by Killexams.com team

CFRN Certified Flight Registered Nurse

1. General principles of transport nursing practice

A. Transport physiology

1. Physiologic stressors of transport

2. Effects of altitude on patients

B. Scene operations

1. Secure landing zone

2. Incident Command System

C. Communications

1. Radio operations

2. Patient handoff (e.g., history from referring provider, updates for receiving provider, SBAR)

3. Crew resource management

D. Safety and survival

1. ELT

2. Navigation (e.g., maps, GPS, night-vision goggles)

3. Transponder codes

4. Survival principles (post-crash)

5. Transport vehicle emergencies

6. Pre-mission preparation (e.g., shift preparedness, risk assessment, crew briefings, weather limitations,AMRM)

E. Management of man-made disasters (e.g., terrorism, industrial accident, transportation accident, mass casualties)

F. Professional issues

1. Evidence-based practice and research

2. Legal issues

a. HIPAA

b. EMTALA

c. Consent

d. Mandatory reporting (e.g., abuse, neglect, diversion, non-accidental trauma)

e. Legal concepts in patient care (e.g., negligence, assault, battery, abandonment)

3. Ethical issues

4. Psychosocial issues in transport, including families

G. Management

1. Quality management and fair work environment

2. Outreach and community education

3. Stress management (e.g., self-care, post-traumatic critical incident)

2. Resuscitation principles 27 31

A. Principles of assessment and patient preparation

1. Physical assessment

2. Pain and comfort assessment

3. Preparing the patient for transport (i.e., packaging)

B. Airway management

1. Airway assessment

2. Airway management

3. Difficulties encountered with airway

4. Rapid Sequence Induction for Intubation (RSI), including pharmacology

C. Mechanical ventilation

1. Invasive ventilation

2. Non-invasive ventilation

D. Perfusion

1. Components of oxygen delivery

2. Shock pathophysiology

3. Trauma triad (hypothermia, acidosis, coagulopathies)

4. Acid base imbalances

3. Trauma 26 31

A. Principles of management

1. Mechanism of injury

2. Shock

a. Hypovolemic

b. Obstructive

c. Distributive (including neurogenic)

d. Cardiogenic

3. Immobilization

B. Neurologic

1. Traumatic brain injuries

2. Spinal cord injuries

3. Post-traumatic seizures

C. Thoracic

1. Chest wall injuries

2. Pulmonary injuries

3. Cardiac injuries

4. Great vessel injuries

D. Abdominal

1. Hollow organ injuries

2. Solid organ injuries

3. Diaphragmatic injuries

4. Retroperitoneal injuries

5. Abdominal compartment syndrome

E. Orthopedic

1. Vertebral injuries

2. Pelvic injuries

3. Compartment syndrome

4. Amputations

5. Extremity fractures

6. Soft-tissue injuries

F. Burn

1. Chemical burns

2. Electrical burns

3. Thermal burns

4. Radiological burns

5. Inhalation injuries

G. Maxillofacial and neck

1. Facial injuries, including fractures

2. Ocular injuries

3. Blunt and penetrating neck injuries

4. Medical emergencies 44 44

A. Neurologic

1. Seizure disorders

2. Stroke

3. Neuromuscular disorders

4. Space occupying lesions

a. Blood

b. Tumors

c. Abscesses

d. Hydrocephalus

e. Encephalopathies

B. Cardiovascular

1. Acute coronary syndrome

2. Congestive heart failure

3. Pulmonary edema

4. Dysrhythmias

5. Aortic abnormalities

6. Hypertension

7. Mechanical/circulatory support (e.g., IABP, VAD, pacing)

C. Pulmonary

1. COPD

2. Acute lung injury/ARDS

3. Pulmonary infections

4. Asthma

5. Pulmonary embolism

D. Abdominal

1. Abdominal compartment syndrome

2. GI bleed

3. Conditions of the hollow organs (e.g., obstruction,rupture)

4. Conditions of the solid organs (e.g., pancreatitis, hepatitis)

E. Electrolyte disturbances

F. Metabolic and endocrine

1. Diabetic emergencies

2. Neuroendocrine disorders (e.g., diabetes insipidus, SIADH, HHNK)

3. Thyroid conditions

4. Adrenal disorders

G. Hematology

1. Coagulopathies (including platelet disorders)

2. Anemias

H. Renal

1. Acute kidney injury (i.e., acute renal failure)

2. Chronic renal failure

I. Infectious and communicable diseases

1. SIRS and sepsis

2. Isolation precautions (e.g., MRSA, influenza-like illness, highly-infectious diseases)

J. Shock

1. Hypovolemic

2. Obstructive

3. Distributive (including neurogenic and anaphylaxis)

4. Cardiogenic

K. Environmental and toxicological emergencies

1. Environment

a. Allergic reactions

b. Cold related (e.g., hypothermia, frostbite)

c. Heat related (e.g., heatstroke, heat exhaustion)

d. Submersion injuries (i.e., diving injuries, drowning, near drowning)

e. Bites and envenomation

2. Toxicology

A. Obstetrical patients

1. Complications of pregnancy

2. Delivery and post-partum care of mother and infant

3. Trauma

B. Pediatric

1. Trauma

2. Medical (e.g., respiratory, cardiac, and neurological emergencies, metabolic disturbances)

C. Geriatric

1. Trauma (e.g., falls, immobilization)

2. Medical (e.g., drug interactions and comorbidities, dementia)

D. Bariatric (e.g., logistical issues, drug dosage, skin issues,airway management)



Procedures

PA catheter

Point-of-care testing

Video laryngoscopy

Chest radiographs

Transvenous pacing

Capnography for non-intubated patients

Surgical cricothyrotomy

Therapeutic hypothermia

Central venous pressure measurement

Arterial line

Needle cricothyrotomy

Needle thoracostomy

Tourniquet application

Central line

Chest tube

Pelvic stabilization

Non-invasive mechanical ventilation

Traction splint

12-lead ECG

Invasive mechanical ventilation

Transcutaneous pacing

Blood product administration

Capnography for intubated patients

Endotrachael intubation

Initiate/titrate medications

Intraosseous catheter

IABP operation

Escharotomy

CT scans

Medical circulatory devices (VAD, Impella®)

Fracture/dislocation reduction

ICP monitoring

Pericardiocentesis

Neck radiographs

Ventriculostomy monitoring
Certified Flight Registered Nurse
Medical Registered test

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Medical
CFRN
Certified Flight Registered Nurse
https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFRN
B. status epilepticus
C. trismus
D. drug overdose
E. head injury
Answer: A
Question: 8
The most effective means of minimizing heat loss and facilitating survival in open water is to
tread water.
A. False
B. True
Answer: A
Question: 9
Which of the following statements comprises a component of the Emergency Medical Treatment
and Active Labor Act (EMTALA)?
A. Any patient who arrives at an emergency department and requests an examination to
determine the presence or absence of an emergency medical condition shall be provided such an
examination.
a patient must be transferred, the transfer facility must have the space and personnel
B. If
necessary to care for the patient.
C. In the case of a patient transfer, the referring facility must provide all necessary
documentation to the transfer facility.
D. In the case of a patient transfer, qualified personnel, necessary medical equipment, and the
most appropriate transport mode must be available.
E. All of the above statements comprise components of the Emergency Medical Treatment and
Active Labor Act(EMTALA).
Answer: E
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Medical Registered test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFRN Search results Medical Registered test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFRN https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical ChatGPT bombs test on diagnosing kids’ medical cases with 83% error rate
Dr. Greg House has a better rate of accurately diagnosing patients than ChatGPT.
Enlarge / Dr. Greg House has a better rate of accurately diagnosing patients than ChatGPT.

ChatGPT is still no House, MD.

While the chatty AI bot has previously underwhelmed with its attempts to diagnose challenging medical cases—with an accuracy rate of 39 percent in an analysis last year—a study out this week in JAMA Pediatrics suggests the fourth version of the large language model is especially bad with kids. It had an accuracy rate of just 17 percent when diagnosing pediatric medical cases.

The low success rate suggests human pediatricians won't be out of jobs any time soon, in case that was a concern. As the authors put it: "[T]his study underscores the invaluable role that clinical experience holds." But it also identifies the critical weaknesses that led to ChatGPT's high error rate and ways to transform it into a useful tool in clinical care. With so much interest and experimentation with AI chatbots, many pediatricians and other doctors see their integration into clinical care as inevitable.

The medical field has generally been an early adopter of AI-powered technologies, resulting in some notable failures, such as creating algorithmic racial bias, as well as successes, such as automating administrative tasks and helping to interpret chest scans and retinal images. There's also lot in between. But AI's potential for problem-solving has raised considerable interest in developing it into a helpful tool for complex diagnostics—no eccentric, prickly, pill-popping medical genius required.

In the new study conducted by researchers at Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New York, ChatGPT-4 showed it isn't ready for pediatric diagnoses yet. Compared to general cases, pediatric ones require more consideration of the patient's age, the researchers note. And as any parent knows, diagnosing conditions in infants and small children is especially hard when they can't pinpoint or articulate all the symptoms they're experiencing.

For the study, the researchers put the chatbot up against 100 pediatric case challenges published in JAMA Pediatrics and NEJM between 2013 and 2023. These are medical cases published as challenges or quizzes. Physicians reading along are invited to try to come up with the correct diagnosis of a complex or unusual case based on the information that attending doctors had at the time. Sometimes, the publications also explain how attending doctors got to the correct diagnosis.

Missed connections

For ChatGPT's test, the researchers pasted the relevant text of the medical cases into the prompt, and then two qualified physician-researchers scored the AI-generated answers as correct, incorrect, or "did not fully capture the diagnosis." In the latter case, ChatGPT came up with a clinically related condition that was too broad or unspecific to be considered the correct diagnosis. For instance, ChatGPT diagnosed one child's case as caused by a branchial cleft cyst—a lump in the neck or below the collarbone—when the correct diagnosis was Branchio-oto-renal syndrome, a genetic condition that causes the abnormal development of tissue in the neck, and malformations in the ears and kidneys. One of the signs of the condition is the formation of branchial cleft cysts.

Overall, ChatGPT got the right answer in just 17 of the 100 cases. It was plainly wrong in 72 cases, and did not fully capture the diagnosis of the remaining 11 cases. Among the 83 wrong diagnoses, 47 (57 percent) were in the same organ system.

Among the failures, researchers noted that ChatGPT appeared to struggle with spotting known relationships between conditions that an experienced physician would hopefully pick up on. For example, it didn't make the connection between autism and scurvy (Vitamin C deficiency) in one medical case. Neuropsychiatric conditions, such as autism, can lead to restricted diets, and that in turn can lead to vitamin deficiencies. As such, neuropsychiatric conditions are notable risk factors for the development of vitamin deficiencies in kids living in high-income countries, and clinicians should be on the lookout for them. ChatGPT, meanwhile, came up with the diagnosis of a rare autoimmune condition.

Though the chatbot struggled in this test, the researchers suggest it could improve by being specifically and selectively trained on accurate and trustworthy medical literature—not stuff on the Internet, which can include inaccurate information and misinformation. They also suggest chatbots could improve with more real-time access to medical data, allowing the models to refine their accuracy, described as "tuning."

"This presents an opportunity for researchers to investigate if specific medical data training and tuning can improve the diagnostic accuracy of LLM-based chatbots," the authors conclude.

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 09:46:00 -0600 Beth Mole en-us text/html https://arstechnica.com/science/2024/01/dont-use-chatgpt-to-diagnose-your-kids-illness-study-finds-83-error-rate/
Can an employer drug test, fire you for medical marijuana in Kentucky? What the law says No result found, try new keyword!Kentuckians can purchase and possess medical cannabis under conditions laid out in a 2022 executive order from Gov. Andy Beshear, and beginning in 2025, they’ll be able to obtain medical marijuana ... Thu, 04 Jan 2024 01:22:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Medical admission test on February 9

The admission test for medical colleges under 2023-24 academic sessions will be held on February 9.

The one-hour-long admission test will begin at 10am on the day.

All coaching centres will remain closed for a month.

The decision was taken at a meeting on the MBBS and BDS admission tests for the academic year 2023-24 held at the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare on Sunday.

Health and Family Welfare Minister Zahid Maleque presided over the meeting.

Sat, 23 Dec 2023 23:35:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/education/334800/medical-admission-test-on-february-9
Best No Exam Life Insurance Companies of January 2024

Our experts answer readers' insurance questions and write unbiased product reviews (here's how we assess insurance products). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners; however, our opinions are our own.

Many of the best life insurance companies offer no-exam life insurance, which has the obvious appeal of skipping medical exams. 

SBLI Life Insurance

Insider’s Rating
A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star
3.56/5

AM Best Financial Strength Rating

A

Pros
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Whole and term life insurance products
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Final expense options
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Diverse life insurance riders available
Cons
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Company does not post important information like limits on its site
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. No universal life insurance options
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Age limit of 60 on accelerated underwriting

Bestow Life

Insider’s Rating
A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star A five pointed star
3.37/5

AM Best Financial Strength Rating

A+

Pros
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Premiums as low as $8/month
  • Check mark icon A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction. Easy online access
Cons
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Company only offers term policies
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Limited support for customer needs
  • con icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. Maximum coverage limits are low

Complete Editorial Review of the Best No Exam Life Insurance Companies

  • Ethos Life: Best Term Life Policy
  • AARP Life Insurance: Best for Seniors
  • USAA Life Insurance: Best for Military Members
  • Prudential Life Insurance: Best for Higher Policy Limits
  • Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance: Best for Guaranteed Acceptance
  • AAA Life Insurance: Best for Waiting Period

Compare the Best No Exam Life Insurance 

Many insurers offer a range of permanent and term life insurance policies that require a medical exam. These companies offer the best no medical exam life insurance policies. 

Best Term Life Policy

Ethos No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Ethos Life accepts applicants up to age 65 with a 100% online application process, and limits are as high as $2 million. 

Ethos Life asks a few basic medical questions, but coverage is effective immediately once approved. In addition, every customer buying policies like this from Ethos Life is eligible for a 30-day look period, which is another way to say you can cancel and get your money back in the first 30 days with no penalties.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $2 million
  • Age: 20-65
  • Waiting period: May apply
  • Unique feature: Instant quotes available with a streamlined online application

Ethos Life Insurance Review

Best for Seniors

AARP No Medical Exam Life Insurance

AARP Life Insurance caters to senior clients for insurance and many other financial products. Older adults between 50 and 74 may qualify as long as they are AARP members. Term policies are available with limits up to $150,000 in most states. Montana and New York residents may be eligible for up to $100,000. Whole life policy limits max out at $25,000.

Whole life policies can be issued without any health exams or medical questions. The term policies, on the other hand, may ask some health questions.

  • Health questions: For term life policies, but not whole
  • Coverage limits: Up to $150,000
  • Age: 50-74
  • Unique feature: No medical exam policy caters to older adults

AARP Life Insurance Review

Best for Military Members

USAA No Medical Exam Life Insurance

USAA Life Insurance is typically associated with military members and their immediate family members, but its insurance products are available to anyone. Pricing is lower, payouts are higher, and customer service is strong. Of course, these services are only available to military and qualifying family members. For the children of a deceased military member to use any USAA products, the military member would need to be signed up before their death.

Guaranteed whole life policies are available in 49 states, excluding Montana. USAA life insurance coverage is available from $2,000 to $25,000 with no medical exam or questions. Applicants who want higher coverage limits can explore medical exam policy options with a licensed agent.

  • Health questions: No
  • Coverage limits: Up to $25,000
  • Age: 45-85
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: Below-market product costs available for military members and qualifying family

USAA Life Insurance Review

Best for Higher Policy Limits

Prudential No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Prudential Life Insurance offers up to $3 million in coverage for term life policies. Adults up to 60 years old are eligible for coverage with a short application involving some medical questions. For younger applicants, conversion options may also be available later to make term policies into whole life policies. However, due to the higher limits, Prudential's application process may also be longer.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $3 million
  • Age: 20-60
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: High expert and customer rankings with a trusted provider

Prudential Life Insurance Review

Best for Guaranteed Acceptance

Mutual of Omaha No Medical Exam Life Insurance

Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance has high financial stability and customer satisfaction ratings across different types of insurance. Guaranteed life policies are available for adults between the ages of 45 and 85. In New York state, the age range is 50-75. Policies can be as small as $2,000 in most states and as large as $25,000 with no health questions or medical exams.

Mutual of Omaha's no medical exam policies have a graded death benefit. If you die within two years of the policy start date, the company will not pay the full policy. Instead, it delivers 110% of the premiums paid. The Mutual of Omaha website boasts same-day payouts on most policies. Policies for children are also available.

  • Health questions: No
  • Coverage limits: Up to $25,000
  • Age: 45-85 (50-75 in New York State)
  • Waiting period: Two years
  • Unique feature: Company website lists same-day payment on most claims

Mutual of Omaha Life Insurance Review

Best for Waiting Period

AAA No Medical Exam Life Insurance

AAA Life Insurance offers immediate death benefits for qualified applicants between 18 and 75. In other words, once your policy starts, you are eligible for the full policy benefit. Policies are available with limits as low as $25,000 and as high as $500,000. While a medical exam is not required, health questions are.

AAA offers term policies with limits as high as $500,000. For a whole life policy, the limit is $25,000. But applicants can add a rider doubling the payout for accidental death coverage. Younger people have no waiting period for benefits. For applicants over age 45, AAA pays out 130% of the premiums paid up to the date of death for the first two years.

  • Health questions: Yes
  • Coverage limits: Up to $500,000 term/$25,000 whole
  • Age: 18-75
  • Waiting period: Applies after age 45
  • Unique feature: Death benefit available regardless of the cause of death

No Medical Exam Life Insurance FAQs

A no medical exam life insurance policy could be right for you if you're able to qualify and don't need special coverage. These policies are the easiest to get for young applicants with no significant health issues. Older applicants can buy with some companies, but acceptance is not guaranteed. No medical exam policies offer less coverage with higher premiums in most cases. If you do not qualify for the no medical exam policy you want, insurance agents can help you explore alternatives. 

No medical exam means life insurance companies will not check your blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. However, companies have access to prescription history and other personal records, and underwriters base decisions partly on this history.

You'll have to decide whether you prefer a whole or term policy based on your situation if you're getting no medical life insurance. A term policy has an expiration date, and extensions or conversions to a whole life policy are not guaranteed. If anything, your rate may be higher if you try to convert your policy. The insurer looks at you just as it would any other applicant of your age, health, etc. A whole life policy locks in premiums and payouts.

There are alternatives to a new medical exam life insurance policy. Insurance agents can quote you medical exam policies if you're denied a no medical exam option. An experienced agent may be able to assess your application before starting the process to avoid official denials. If you're concerned about premium limits, you can explore options like IUL (indexed universal life) for permanent life insurance that increases your benefit as long as you make premium payments.

A no medical exam life insurance policy may hold a certain appeal for older applicants and those in failing health. However, the life insurance market is the opposite of what you might expect. These policies are best for young people (typically under 50 years old) in good health. The no medical exam process is often more efficient, streamlining your approval, and life insurance companies can only do this with low-risk applicants.

If a provider sees red flags that might disqualify you, it won't necessarily prevent you from getting coverage. Instead, the agent would most likely offer to run more conventional life insurance quotes for you.

Guaranteed issue life insurance policies do not require a medical exam. This type of life insurance is typically limited to people ages 50 or older, and the tradeoff is that policies are usually more expensive than ones that do require a medical exam. That said, if your health conditions would otherwise prevent you from getting a life insurance policy, guaranteed issue insurance is a useful option, and it's offered by a variety of insurers including AIG, AAA, New York Life, and Gerber Life.

Yes, you can really get life insurance without a medical exam, but your options will be different. That's because you'll need to choose a guaranteed issue policy — a specific type of insurance that lets you bypass the medical exam requirement — and it will probably cost more than a regular policy including a medical exam.

The highest amount of life insurance you can get without a medical exam is lower than what you could get with a medical exam. Guaranteed issue policies that don't require medical exams typically top out at $25,000 or $50,000 in coverage, while standard life insurance policies can offer millions in coverage.

How to Pick the Best No Medical Exam Life Insurance Policy for You

Particularly when choosing life insurance, customization is critical. Buyers don't need to add every rider, but a little research goes a long way in selecting the right company. Some applicants will not qualify for a no medical exam life insurance policy. A life insurance agent can help you run quotes that make sense for you. Then agents can offer realistic insurance policy options and review the costs and benefits of each.

Asking friends and family which insurance agent they use could be your first step to finding the right life policy. Factors like age, medical history, and financial goals play key roles in your decision. So we do not recommend asking loved ones about individual policies. Instead, let a qualified insurance professional find the best policies for you.

Why You Should Trust Us: How We Chose the Best No Exam Life Insurance

The coverage and riders offered are vital parts of our evaluation. We also look at the speed of payouts, customer satisfaction, and financial strength ratings. All of these factor into the immediate and long-term performance of the life insurance companies we review.

If you're looking for more information about a specific life insurer, our individual reviews offer a deep dive into individual policies, riders, and more. The same considerations are used for all competitors to ensure readers have the edge to make informed decisions in an ever-changing market.

See our insurance rating methodology for more details.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 09:59:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-no-medical-exam-life-insurance
AI’s big test: Making sense of $4 trillion in medical expenses

Hospitals and insurers are racing to find new artificial intelligence tools to give them an edge in billing and processing their part of the $4 trillion in medical expenses Americans accrue each year.

As one of the largest parts of the U.S. economy undergoes perhaps its biggest transition in decades, billions of dollars are at stake — not only for health care providers and insurers, but also for the government, which handles millions of Medicare and Medicaid claims every year.

For providers, the dream is an AI tool that can quickly and aggressively code procedures and file claims. Insurers — and the government agencies that pay for health care — want comparable technology to scrub those bills.

“Everyone’s trying to maximize revenue while toeing the line on, effectively, fraud,” said Nick Stepro, chief product and technology officer at Arcadia, a company that works with health care organizations on both sides of the divide looking to build the technology.

It’s true, he believes, that advanced AI will bring a host of positive impacts to the health system — but perhaps not before it further inflames the feuds over bills between your health plan and your medical provider.

“Now, all of a sudden, you have this massive superpower that is generative AI,” he said. “That’s going to let people move really, really, really quickly in this space — and sort of create an arms race.”

Getting there first isn’t only about winning the billing wars: Both providers and insurers hope to reap efficiencies if they can downsize their huge administrative workforces, reduce liability or speed up their paperwork processing.

For policymakers, AI is adding a wrinkle to Washington’s perpetual fretting over the high cost of health care.

Some in Congress and President Joe Biden want to streamline the prior-authorization process insurers require before they approve some treatments. Washington’s also taking another look at how surprise billing is handled — a 2020 law has thus far failed to stem the disputes between providers and insurers over care patients received unwittingly from out-of-network doctors.

Nearly everyone in health policy is trying to figure out how to stretch a beleaguered workforce facing growing demand for care.

But Congress has barely begun to grapple with how AI could affect these issues. And the administration is just beginning to work out its approach to regulating the technology — even as the ground is shifting for hospitals, doctors and insurers vying for a tech edge.

‘We need to have an AI strategy’

Business is booming for Punit Soni, CEO of the health AI company Suki.

“We are seeing that every health system across the country is saying: ‘We need to have an AI strategy,’” he said.

Soni’s company aims for the trifecta his provider clients want — happier clinicians, more patients and more money — by assisting doctors in taking notes and coding the care delivered. Buyers of the company’s tools are sometimes seeing revenue rise over 20 percent, he said — and seeing denials fall by nearly the same amount.

“When we meet health systems, we give them a buffet, and we say: ‘Here’s a bunch of things we can impact that matter to you,’” he said. “All three are really serious [return-on-investment] objectives.”

For hospitals amid a money crunch, Soni’s promises are soothing.

According to credit rating firm Fitch Ratings, they lack cash and face ongoing struggles to staff their facilities. They’re also bracing for a 3.4 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to doctors in January, unless Congress acts to avert it. Doctors describe the pending cut as an existential threat to their practices.

The health industry could see more defaults in 2024 compared with earlier years, a recent Moody’s analysis found.

More than 20 health, tech and policy leaders interviewed for this story — as well as presenters at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society conference on AI earlier this month in San Diego — underscored that interest in how artificial intelligence will affect the industry’s bottom line is front-of-mind. Even AI that benefits patient care and betters administrative systems has to be paid for, they said.

Some health systems told POLITICO they want to reap savings by coding their bills more accurately and, therefore, reducing their liability.

Others highlight the benefits of reducing the labor needed to complete administrative tasks. And nearly all providers are keenly interested in making their staff happier by reducing burnout.

Health system executives said they want to see tangible progress on their AI investments every 90 days, and they’re partnering with tech companies and even other health groups to produce results faster.

There’s another reason for hospitals and doctors’ practices to proceed swiftly and deliberately: The insurers that pay their bills have long sought ways to better scrutinize the charges, and AI is just the latest tool, said Anders Gilberg, senior vice president of government affairs at the Medical Group Management Association, a doctors’ group.

He said doctors often fear overcoding because of the stiff penalties that can come with it. But he also acknowledged another way they may think about it.

“One could say, ‘all is fair and love and war — the payers are using it, the providers should too.’”

‘The perfect storm coming’

Some of the biggest health insurers — including Humana and UnitedHealth — face lawsuits claiming they are using AI to deny care.

The plaintiffs in the suits, filed this fall, argue the companies rejected doctors’ orders more often after embracing AI tools to monitor care.

A spokesperson for naviHealth’s nH Predict tool, cited in the UnitedHealth and Humana suits, said the plaintiffs misunderstand the role of the technology — that it’s used to evaluate what care may be needed, not to decide whether to approve it.

Humana and UnitedHealth declined to comment on the pending litigation. Each of the companies said it wants to implement the tech in ways that both promote patient wellbeing and increase efficiency.

More broadly, insurers say they are making major investments in AI, both to cut their own administrative costs and to weed out fraud in the bills they receive.

“It feels like the perfect storm coming of the technology really becoming a more significant asset to the company if deployed correctly,” said Craig Richardville, chief information officer of Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Health, which does business as both a provider and payer.

The government, meanwhile, is caught in the middle. Every year, it incurs $60 billion in fraudulent Medicare bills, according to government estimates. Medicaid fraud costs the states and federal government tens of billions more.

The government already creates many of the rules that govern health care billing and is using AI to combat fraud, according to the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association, an alliance of government agencies and private insurers.

A spokesperson for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a statement that “CMS continually assesses opportunities to safely and responsibly leverage new, innovative strategies and technologies, including AI, to more effectively accomplish its mission.”

At the same time, the agency has to answer to patients skeptical of strict anti-fraud measures that can result in denied care. Starting Jan. 1, CMS will begin requiring the private insurers who run Medicare plans to ensure they’re “making medical necessity determinations based on the circumstances of the specific individual, as opposed to using an algorithm or software,” according to congressional testimony.

‘It’s going to add gasoline’

When insurers and providers can’t agree on a bill, it’s often patients caught in the middle — or stuck on hold waiting to talk to a customer service representative.

If AI helps insurers deny care, or amps up the fights between medical providers and health plans over bills, will patients have to mediate?

The 2020 legislation Congress passed to help patients who receive surprise medical bills from providers outside of their networks underscores the policy thicket.

A mediation process set up by the Department of Health and Human Services to sort out the bills has received more than 20 times as many claims from providers as the government anticipated, and 60 percent remain unresolved, according to a recent tally. This month, the administration said it was reworking its process.

Still, both providers and insurers say they expect the AI takeover of the billing process to help patients more than it hurts them.

“Do I think people will use it as a hammer?” said John Couris, president and CEO of Florida Health Sciences Center, which runs Tampa General Hospital, of the technology. “I mean, I think they probably will — on both sides.”

But Couris said the health industry is mostly just “desperate” for AI products that fix the complicated billing systems that so frustrate patients.

Even so, policymakers charged with making sure that happens are just beginning to evaluate their role.

Some House Democrats, including Reps. Judy Chu of California and Jerry Nadler of New York, have opened an inquiry into whether private plans in Medicare are too quick to use AI to deny care, while others, from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), are holding hearings and forums on how the tech will change the way doctors treat patients — and bill for that treatment.

Mostly, Congress is just beginning to talk about legislation. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) introduced a bill last month that would task the Commerce Department with conferring with other agencies to begin the process of setting some guardrails.

Biden issued an executive order in October that set some reporting deadlines for agencies to assess what should be done. HHS issued transparency rules for health AI earlier this month, but its focus was technology used in clinical decision-making, not billing.

Meanwhile, nearly every aspect of the health care industry is trying to gain an advantage with major stakes: AI’s role in billing could impact the sustainability of Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers, as well as hospitals, clinics and providers of all kinds.

Stepro of Arcadia, who’s helping both providers and insurers build the tools they hope will help them thrive, senses the urgency.

“It’s going to add gasoline to a lot of existing tension in how money flows in health care,” he said.

Chelsea Cirruzzo contributed to this report.

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 09:48:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.politico.com/news/2023/12/31/ai-medical-expenses-00132557 MOE: O-Level exam results to be released Jan 11 No result found, try new keyword!SINGAPORE: The Ministry of Education (MOE) announced on Thursday (Jan 4) that the 2023 Singapore-Cambridge... The post MOE: O-Level exam results to be released Jan 11 appeared first on The Independent ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 17:40:21 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ American Medical Association (AMA) Grants Cardio Diagnostics Holdings, Inc.’s AI-Powered Coronary Heart Disease Detection Test, PrecisionCHD, a Dedicated CPT PLA ... No result found, try new keyword!was responsible for over 375,000 deaths in 2021 and the medical costs associated with CHD are projected to reach about $215 billion by 2035. The PrecisionCHD test, which evaluates a patient’s ... Mon, 01 Jan 2024 18:30:00 -0600 https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240102855521/en/American-Medical-Association-AMA-Grants-Cardio-Diagnostics-Holdings-Inc.%E2%80%99s-AI-Powered-Coronary-Heart-Disease-Detection-Test-PrecisionCHD-a-Dedicated-CPT-PLA-Reimbursement-Code/ How to get medical help over Christmas in France No result found, try new keyword!Whether you already live in France or you are visiting during the Christmas holidays, here is what to do if you need to access medical care. Fri, 22 Dec 2023 01:10:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.thelocal.fr/20231222/how-to-get-medical-help-over-christmas-in-france Exit Exam now mandatory for D.Pharm students, PCI directs state councils not to register new passouts until exam is cleared

New Delhi Diploma in Pharmacy ( D.Pharm) candidates from next year have to give exit exam in order to get their degrees and qualify to practice, a recent circular issued by the Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) has mandated. The exam will be held in July-September 2024 for the 2022–24 academic session, the PCI has informed

Further, the Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) directed the various state pharmacy councils and registration tribunals not to register the candidates admitted to the Diploma in Pharmacy program during the 2022-23 academic session and passed in the 2023-24 academic session as pharmacists until they pass the exit examination and fulfil the other prescribed conditions under section 32(2) of the Pharmacy Act.

The Medical Dialogues team had earlier reported that in February 2022, the Pharmacy Council of India, via a Gazette notification, released the "Diploma in Pharmacy Exit Examination Regulations, 2022" which called for a Diploma in Pharmacy Exit Examination after the completion of the course, making it mandatory for registration and a license to practice as a pharmacist. The exit examination was further scheduled to take place twice a year or as frequently as may be required as per the schedule of examinations announced by the prescribed authority. The examination date and centre will also be assigned to candidates by the prescribed authority based on the availability of the examination centres, the council stated.

The PCI has now informed that the said exam will be conducted by the National Board of Examination in Medical Sciences (NBEMS) from next year onwards. PCI further stated that the said exam will be conducted in the month of July-September, however, the date has not yet been declared.

" It is informed that council is going to conduct the Diploma in Pharmacy Exit Examination in July-September 2024 for 2022-24 academic session for D.Pharm. course through NBEMS. The exact dates for Exit Examination will be announced in due course of time,"

It further directed the state councils not to register new candidates as pharmacists, till they clear the exit exam

"In view of above, it is requested to not to register the candidates as a registered pharmacist who have admitted in the 2022-23 academic session Diploma in Pharmacy and passed out in 2023-24 academic session until they-

1. Qualify the Exit Examination and

2. 2 fulfil the other prescribed conditions u/s 23(2) of the Pharmacy Act, 1948,"

Thu, 28 Dec 2023 17:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://medicaldialogues.in/news/industry/pharmacy-education/exit-exam-now-mandatory-for-dpharm-students-pci-directs-state-councils-not-to-register-new-passouts-until-exam-is-cleared-122275
AI’s big test: Making sense of $4 trillion in medical expenses

Hospitals and insurers are racing to find new artificial intelligence tools to give them an edge in billing and processing their part of the $4 trillion in medical expenses Americans accrue each year.

As one of the largest parts of the U.S. economy undergoes perhaps its biggest transition in decades, billions of dollars are at stake — not only for health care providers and insurers, but also for the government, which handles millions of Medicare and Medicaid claims every year.

For providers, the dream is an AI tool that can quickly and aggressively code procedures and file claims. Insurers — and the government agencies that pay for health care — want comparable technology to scrub those bills.

“Everyone's trying to maximize revenue while towing the line on, effectively, fraud,” said Nick Stepro, chief product and technology officer at Arcadia, a company that works with health care organizations on both sides of the divide looking to build the technology.

It’s true, he believes, that advanced AI will bring a host of positive impacts to the health system — but perhaps not before it further inflames the feuds over bills between your health plan and your medical provider.

“Now, all of a sudden, you have this massive superpower that is generative AI,” he said. “That's going to let people move really, really, really quickly in this space — and sort of create an arms race.”

Getting there first isn’t only about winning the billing wars: Both providers and insurers hope to reap efficiencies if they can downsize their huge administrative workforces, reduce liability or speed up their paperwork processing.

For policymakers, AI is adding a wrinkle to Washington’s perpetual fretting over the high cost of health care.

Some in Congress and President Joe Biden want to streamline the prior-authorization process insurers require before they approve some treatments. Washington’s also taking another look at how surprise billing is handled — a 2020 law has thus far failed to stem the disputes between providers and insurers over care patients received unwittingly from out-of-network doctors.

Nearly everyone in health policy is trying to figure out how to stretch a beleaguered workforce facing growing demand for care.

But Congress has barely begun to grapple with how AI could affect these issues. And the administration is just beginning to work out its approach to regulating the technology — even as the ground is shifting for hospitals, doctors and insurers vying for a tech edge.

‘We need to have an AI strategy’

Business is booming for Punit Soni, CEO of the health AI company Suki.

“We are seeing that every health system across the country is saying: ‘We need to have an AI strategy,’” he said.

Soni’s company aims for the trifecta his provider clients want — happier clinicians, more patients and more money — by assisting doctors in taking notes and coding the care delivered. Buyers of the company’s tools are sometimes seeing revenue rise over 20 percent, he said — and seeing denials fall by nearly the same amount.

“When we meet health systems, we give them a buffet, and we say: ‘Here's a bunch of things we can impact that matter to you,’” he said. “All three are really serious [return-on-investment] objectives.”

For hospitals amid a money crunch, Soni’s promises are soothing.

According to credit rating firm Fitch Ratings, they lack cash and face ongoing struggles to staff their facilities. They’re also bracing for a 3.4 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to doctors in January, unless Congress acts to avert it. Doctors describe the pending cut as an existential threat to their practices.

The health industry could see more defaults in 2024 compared with earlier years, a recent Moody’s analysis found.

More than 20 health, tech and policy leaders interviewed for this story — as well as presenters at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society conference on AI earlier this month in San Diego — underscored that interest in how artificial intelligence will affect the industry’s bottom line is front-of-mind. Even AI that benefits patient care and betters administrative systems has to be paid for, they said.

Some health systems told POLITICO they want to reap savings by coding their bills more accurately and, therefore, reducing their liability.

Others highlight the benefits of reducing the labor needed to complete administrative tasks. And nearly all providers are keenly interested in making their staff happier by reducing burnout.

Health system executives said they want to see tangible progress on their AI investments every 90 days, and they’re partnering with tech companies and even other health groups to produce results faster.

There’s another reason for hospitals and doctors’ practices to proceed swiftly and deliberately: The insurers that pay their bills have long sought ways to better scrutinize the charges, and AI is just the latest tool, said Anders Gilberg, senior vice president of government affairs at the Medical Group Management Association, a doctors’ group.

He said doctors often fear overcoding because of the stiff penalties that can come with it. But he also acknowledged another way they may think about it.

“One could say, ‘all is fair and love and war — the payers are using it, the providers should too.’”

‘The perfect storm coming’

Some of the biggest health insurers — including Humana and UnitedHealth — face lawsuits claiming they are using AI to deny care.

The plaintiffs in the suits, filed this fall, argue the companies rejected doctors’ orders more often after embracing AI tools to monitor care.

A spokesperson for naviHealth's nH Predict tool, cited in the UnitedHealth and Humana suits, said the plaintiffs misunderstand the role of the technology — that it’s used to evaluate what care may be needed, not to decide whether to approve it.

Humana and UnitedHealth declined to comment on the pending litigation. Each of the companies said it wants to implement the tech in ways that both promote patient wellbeing and increase efficiency.

More broadly, insurers say they are making major investments in AI, both to cut their own administrative costs and to weed out fraud in the bills they receive.

“It feels like the perfect storm coming of the technology really becoming a more significant asset to the company if deployed correctly,” said Craig Richardville, chief information officer of Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Health, which does business as both a provider and payer.

The government, meanwhile, is caught in the middle. Every year, it incurs $60 billion in fraudulent Medicare bills, according to government estimates. Medicaid fraud costs the states and federal government tens of billions more.

The government already creates many of the rules that govern health care billing and is using AI to combat fraud, according to the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association, an alliance of government agencies and private insurers.

A spokesperson for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a statement that “CMS continually assesses opportunities to safely and responsibly leverage new, innovative strategies and technologies, including AI, to more effectively accomplish its mission.”

At the same time, the agency has to answer to patients skeptical of strict anti-fraud measures that can result in denied care. Starting Jan. 1, CMS will begin requiring the private insurers who run Medicare plans to ensure they’re “making medical necessity determinations based on the circumstances of the specific individual, as opposed to using an algorithm or software,” according to congressional testimony.

‘It's going to add gasoline’

When insurers and providers can’t agree on a bill, it’s often patients caught in the middle — or stuck on hold waiting to talk to a customer service representative.

If AI helps insurers deny care, or amps up the fights between medical providers and health plans over bills, will patients have to mediate?

The 2020 legislation Congress passed to help patients who receive surprise medical bills from providers outside of their networks underscores the policy thicket.

A mediation process set up by the Department of Health and Human Services to sort out the bills has received more than 20 times as many claims from providers as the government anticipated, and 60 percent remain unresolved, according to a recent tally. This month, the administration said it was reworking its process.

Still, both providers and insurers say they expect the AI takeover of the billing process to help patients more than it hurts them.

“Do I think people will use it as a hammer?” said John Couris, president and CEO of Florida Health Sciences Center, which runs Tampa General Hospital, of the technology. “I mean, I think they probably will — on both sides.”

But Couris said the health industry is mostly just “desperate” for AI products that fix the complicated billing systems that so frustrate patients.

Even so, policymakers charged with making sure that happens are just beginning to evaluate their role.

Some House Democrats, including Reps. Judy Chu of California and Jerry Nadler of New York, have opened an inquiry into whether private plans in Medicare are too quick to use AI to deny care, while others, from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), are holding hearings and forums on how the tech will change the way doctors treat patients — and bill for that treatment.

Mostly, Congress is just beginning to talk about legislation. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) introduced a bill last month that would task the Commerce Department with conferring with other agencies to begin the process of setting some guardrails.

Biden issued an executive order in October that set some reporting deadlines for agencies to assess what should be done. HHS issued transparency rules for health AI earlier this month, but its focus was technology used in clinical decision-making, not billing.

Meanwhile, nearly every aspect of the health care industry is trying to gain an advantage with major stakes: AI’s role in billing could impact the sustainability of Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers, as well as hospitals, clinics and providers of all kinds.

Stepro of Arcadia, who’s helping both providers and insurers build the tools they hope will help them thrive, senses the urgency.

“It's going to add gasoline to a lot of existing tension in how money flows in health care,” he said.

Chelsea Cirruzzo contributed to this report.

Sat, 30 Dec 2023 22:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/news/ai-big-test-making-sense-120000855.html




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